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I'm new to PHP and i'm about to finish up a project, however i need to protect my database from SQL injections. Do i need to strip slashes on every sql query i do, or do i only need to do it for sql INSERT/UPDATE statements and not SELECT statements? Or is it best practice to do it for everything?

I'M NOT ASKING HOW TO PREVENT SQL INJECTION, I'M ASKING WHEN TO USE IT.

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marked as duplicate by Marc B, John Conde, Joe Frambach, Álvaro González, thaJeztah Apr 3 '13 at 19:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
stripslashes/addslashes are the PHP equivalent of using used soggy toilet paper to clean up after a hurricane. They're crap, they're useless, and they'll give you an utterly false sense of security. The PHP maintainers should have deprecated those functions at the same time they deprecated magic_quotes and the rest of the outright idiocy in the language. – Marc B Apr 3 '13 at 18:48
    
i know how to prevent it, i'm asking when should i prevent it? – Staleyr Apr 3 '13 at 18:50
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when should you wear a seatbelt? ALWAYS. If you're asking when to prevent it, then you don't really understand the problem. – Marc B Apr 3 '13 at 18:51
    
@Staleyr - you should secure every query you make to the database that has user input in it. – andrewsi Apr 3 '13 at 18:51
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if you're letting user data (including data YOU'RE providing) anywhere NEAR ANY sql statement, you have to prevent injection. you can quite easily inject yourself. – Marc B Apr 3 '13 at 18:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use PDO. Not "PDO or MySQLi", but PDO. It's the only reliable driver available (though offers insufficient protection).

If you want full protection, use SafeMysql

I'M NOT ASKING HOW TO PREVENT SQL INJECTION, I'M ASKING WHEN TO USE IT.

Good question.

  1. You don't need any protection or prevention.
  2. You have to format your queries properly. ALWAYS.
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Thank you for reading the question! haha, and thank you for the answer – Staleyr Apr 3 '13 at 19:16

strip_slashes() is not what you want. You should be using prepared/parameterized queries which separate the data from the SQL, making it inherently safe from this problem.

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Use PDO or mysqli with prepared statements.

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There are so many other ways to inject using SQL. If you want a good example of this, here's one: /* in one field, */ in another. Everything in between will be commented on MySQL4 and MySQL5 without parametrization.

Switch to PDO/MySQLi and request true parametrization from the driver. This will force the driver to send the request without data first, and the data in another packet, thus forcing compliance, along with solving many, many headaches.

If this hasn't convinced you yet, try this link: http://ferruh.mavituna.com/sql-injection-cheatsheet-oku/ .

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