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If I first enter data that is valid it works fine, but if I enter invalid data, then valid data, None is returned. Here is an example of the problem:

screenshot

code:

def passwordLength(password):
    if (len(password) < 4) or (len(password) > 15):
        print("Error from server: Your password must be at least four and at most fifteen characters long.")
        enterPasswords()
    else:
        return True


def passwordMatch(password, password2):
    if password != password2:
        print("Error from server: Your passwords don't match.")
        enterPasswords()
    else:
        return True

def enterPasswords():
    password = input("Message from server: Please enter your desired password: ")
    if passwordLength(password):
        password2 = input("Message from server: Please re-enter your password: ")
        print(password, password2)
        if passwordMatch(password, password2):
            print(password)
            return password

password = enterPasswords()
print(password)
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1  
If control reaches the end of a function without returning anything, None is returned by default. –  Ismail Badawi Apr 3 '13 at 19:11
    
it works for me... it returns what it reads from the keyboard –  Ionut Hulub Apr 3 '13 at 19:16

3 Answers 3

Your problem is that you are not using recursion properly. Take the example of non-matching passwords: hello and hello1.

Your function will be fine until if passwordMatch(password, password2):. At this point, passwordMatch returns None. That is because in passwordMatch you do not say return enterPasswords(), so the return value defaults to None, NOT the return value of the new call to enterPasswords.

    if password != password2:
        print("Error from server: Your passwords don't match.")
        enterPasswords() # Doesn't return anything, so it defaults to None

If you were to use the function like so then you wouldn't have an issue.

def passwordMatch(password, password2):
    if password != password2:
        print("Error from server: Your passwords don't match.")
        return enterPasswords()
    else:
        return True

Please notice that you have the same problem in passwordLength.

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You need a return at every step where you want the method to exit/return to calling method:

def passwordLength(password):
    if (len(password) < 4) or (len(password) > 15):
        print("Error from server: Your password must be at least four and at most fifteen characters long.")
        return enterPasswords()
    #else: is not required here
    return True

def passwordMatch(password, password2):
    if password != password2:
        print("Error from server: Your passwords don't match.")
        return enterPasswords()
    # else: is not required here
    return True

def enterPasswords():
    password = input("Message from server: Please enter your desired password: ")
    if passwordLength(password):
        password2 = input("Message from server: Please re-enter your password: ")
        print(password, password2)
        if passwordMatch(password, password2):
            print(password)
            return password
    return False

password = enterPasswords()
print(password)
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't explain why the program printed None when the passwords matched. –  Ionut Hulub Apr 3 '13 at 19:24

So what happens is that if you first enter invalid data (let's say an invalid password length), you call enterPasswords() again from the passwordLength() function. That prompts you for another password. This time you enter valid input. You get down to where you should return the password, and you return it. The problem is, on the stack, you are returning to where you called enterPasswords() from the passwordLength() function. That is where you are returning the valid password to. It doesn't do anything with it, execution is returned to the original call to enterPasswords() (where the input was invalid) and you're going to return None from there.

A visualization:

enterPasswords() called

    prompted for input, give string of length 3

    passwordLength(password) called

        Invalid string length, print an error and then call enterPasswords()

            prompted for input, give valid string

            passwordLength(password) called

                valid length, return true

            prompted for input for second password

            passwordMatch(password, password2) called

                passwords match, return True

            print password

            return password to the first passwordLength() call

        nothing else to do here, pop the stack and return to the first enterPasswords()

    nothing else to do here, pop the stack

print(password), but password is None here
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