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I have a login filter as shown below :

@WebFilter("*.xhtml")
public class LoginFiltre implements Filter {
    @Override
    public void doFilter(ServletRequest arg0, ServletResponse arg1,
            FilterChain chain) throws IOException, ServletException {

        HttpServletRequest req = (HttpServletRequest) arg0;
        HttpServletResponse res = (HttpServletResponse) arg1;
        System.out.println(req.getRequestURI());
        System.out.println(req.getContextPath());
        Credentials credentials = (Credentials) req.getSession().getAttribute(
                "credentials");

        if (req.getRequestURI().contains("login")) {
            System.out
                    .println("login olmak istiyor faces servlet e yönlendirilecek");
            chain.doFilter(arg0, arg1);
        } else if (credentials != null
                && credentials.getUsername().length() != 0
                && credentials.isIsloggedin()) {
            System.out.println("login olmus faces servlet e yönlendiriliyor");
            chain.doFilter(arg0, arg1);
        } else {
            System.out.println("login olmamis yönlendirilecek");
            res.sendRedirect(req.getContextPath() + "/login.xhtml");
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void init(FilterConfig arg0) throws ServletException {
    }
}

I want this filter to check authentication for all requests except login page what about putting all pages in a folder called secure(except login.xhtml) and using prefix mapping like /secure/* for this filter ?

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closed as not constructive by BalusC, Andrew, uınbɐɥs, Jack Humphries, Chris Lively Apr 4 '13 at 0:01

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This check

if (req.getRequestURI().contains("login")) {

is weak. What if you have e.g. a logins.xhtml listing all logged-in users? You're allowing every URL just containing the characters "login". You should rather perform an exact URL matching.

String loginURL = req.getContextPath() + "/login.xhtml";

if (req.getRequestURI().equals(loginURL)) {

And reuse it in redirect URL as well:

res.sendRedirect(loginURL);

Unrelated to the concrete problem, this filter is also blocking CSS/JS resources. So all <h:outputStylesheet> and <h:outputScript> resources stop working. You perhaps want to allow them as well. Further, the .xhtml extension and your question history suggests that you're using JSF. This filter would fail with no-feedback on JSF ajax requests when the session is expired or the user is logged out on another tab. You should instead return a special XML response to trigger a redirect in JavaScript end. You can find another example in this answer which covers this all: JSF redirect isn't working when button submitted.

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@BalusC:Thanks for advices.I faced media resource blocking problem when I am using /* pattern so i turned extension mapping instead. –  daemon Apr 3 '13 at 20:31
    
This suggests that you were using plain HTML <link> and/or <script> instead of <h:outputStylesheet> and <h:outputScript>. This is not really "JSF-ish". –  BalusC Apr 3 '13 at 20:32
    
yes you are right. –  daemon Apr 3 '13 at 20:38
    
BalusC When I create any scobed managed bean does it implicitly added to the sessionMap, requestMap or Applicaitonmap? so can I use req.getSession().getAttribute("sessionBean"); –  daemon Apr 7 '13 at 22:15

I know this isn't the answer you're looking for, but security is one of those things best left to the pros. Unless you have a very unique set of requirements, you should try to find a suitable open source library such as Spring Security, Apache Shiro, etc. They have spent a lot of time making sure that they're implementations are secure, and they are widely deployed, so they have lots of eyes on them. When you roll your own security, you run the risk of introducing bugs that may later cause a breach.

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your are definitely right but actually I dont hava much time for learning new api.if I need more sucurity I can look up them in future. –  daemon Apr 3 '13 at 20:05
    
daemon If you don't have the time to do it right, then why did you ask people for advice? That said, you don't need to use a 3rd party library for something like this. However, do carefully check the contains("login") line. As @BalusC indicated, that is very broad and thus a security risk. –  Brandon Apr 3 '13 at 20:31

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