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I implemented a simple linked list. Behold!

struct List{
    List *next;
    bool last;
    string data;
};

List *head;

However, when I tried to build it with a function, then traverse it, the program crashed with the error 0x00005 (that's a memory error, right?). in the build function everything seems fine, but otherwise it throws an error. Here's the function I made the list:

void mkList(List *ptr, int num){
    if(num != 0){
        ptr = new List;
        ptr->data = "asd";

        if(num == 1)ptr->last = true;
            else ptr->last = false;

        mkList(ptr->next,num-1);
    }
}

and the method I tried to traverse the list is in main:

int main(){
    mkList(head,5);

    List *ptr = head;

    while(!ptr->last){
        cout << ptr->data <<endl;
        ptr = ptr->next;
    }
    return 0;
}

everything seem to work fine up until the second element, I can even cout the first element's data! What did I do wrong?

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It is a little hard to follow the code. Could you make a small, complete, program that reproduces the error? Also, why do you use the number 6? I am guessing you are trying to build a list with a fixed size, but it can be dangerous to hard-code variables like that. –  Victor Sand Apr 3 '13 at 20:00
    
okay, minifying the code right now. Also I used six, for the cout-s it's just temporary. –  Y.T. Apr 3 '13 at 20:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think you need to re-visit the concept of a pointer. You need to understand that a pointer is a variable that holds the memory address of another variable.

If you have code like this:

void foo(int a){
 a = 5;
}

// ...

int b = 0;
foo(b)

you don't expect b to become 5 after the last line, do you? Same with pointers.

void foo(List *a){
 a = new List;
}

// ...

List *b;
foo(b);

does not affect b in any way. Now, if you'd like to set the value of b from another function, you could pass a pointer to b (remember, a pointer is a variable, so it's perfectly fine to have a pointer to a pointer):

void foo(List **a){
 a = new List;
}

// ...

List *b;
foo(&b);
// now b will point to the newly allocated memory

Once you understand this, it will be very easy for you to fix this code.

share|improve this answer
    
if a give a pointer in a function argument, doesn't the pointer points to an object? I mean A copy of a pointer should point to the same object, right? –  Y.T. Apr 3 '13 at 20:59
1  
> A copy of a pointer should point to the same object -- that is correct. However, in your example: 1) the pointer you're passing is not pointing to any particular object because it's uninitialized 2) when you assign something to a pointer, you are merely changing the value of that pointer. Whatever that pointer is pointing to remains unaffected. Remember, the pointer just holds the address. When you change the pointer, you change the address it holds, but the object to which it is pointing remains unchanged. To actually change that object its pointing to, you need to dereference the pointer. –  gridz Apr 3 '13 at 21:15
    
Also, p->foo is just short for (*p).foo. Thought it might help you understand. –  gridz Apr 3 '13 at 21:16
    
Brilliant! it's what I needed! Thanks! :) –  Y.T. Apr 3 '13 at 21:17

In this line

mkList(ptr->next,num-1);

you are passing a dangling pointer. It just points anywhere. You would actually Need to pass the address of the pointer like in

mkList(&ptr->next,num-1);

and redefine your function to

void mkList(List **ptr, int num);

But this is rather crazy and can be done easier...

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The reason why your program crashes is that in this code:

ptr = new List;
ptr->data = "asd";
...
mkList(ptr->next,num-1); // <-- ptr->next is uninitialized !

you use uninitialized variable ptr->next which produces undefined behavior. Possible solution could be to define a default constructor for your struct:

struct List{
    List() : next(NULL) { }
    List *next;
    string data;
};

where last element in this linked list is the element with next set to NULL. You don't need additional data member for marking the last element (you don't need bool last).

This will resolve the undefined behavior, but to actually make your program work as intended you will need to change the prototype of void mkList(List *ptr, int num) to take the ptr as a pointer to pointer to List, so that changes made to pointer itself are visible to the caller:

void mkList(List** ptr, int num) {
    if (num <= 0)
        return;

    *ptr = new List();
    (*ptr)->data = "asd";
    mkList(&(*ptr)->next, num-1);
}

called like this from the main:

mkList(&head, 5);

although recursion isn't the luckiest choice here. It's good practice to keep it simple and don't be afraid to write more lines of code if it's for the sake of readability:

void mkList(List** ptr, int num)
{
    List* lastNode = NULL;
    for (int i = 0; i < num; ++i)
    {
        // create new node:
        List* node = new List();
        node->data = "asd";

        // store the pointer to the head:
        if (i == 0) *ptr = node;

        // move to the next element:
        if (lastNode) lastNode->next = node;
        lastNode = node;
    }
}
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