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for the following code

#!/usr/bin/ruby -w

nums = File::read("euler18nums.txt");   #opens file with number array inside.
parts = nums.split(' ');                #save it into instance of an array.
t = []                                  #dimension one of the array of arrays.
s = []                                  #dimension two.
j=0                                     #iteration variable.
k=0                                     #iteration variable.
n=1                                     #iteration variable.
parts.collect do |i|                    #itterates through the array that i have my data in.
    s[k] = i.to_i                       #converts strings to int and save into 2nd dimension.
    k+=1
    if k == n                           #number of itterations increase by one every time function is called.
        t[j] = s                        
        n+=1                            #saves second dimension of array into the first,-
        k=0                             #-and this is  where my problem is because it saves into and overwrites-
        test=0                          #-of the array that i have saved.
        while test != n                 #this is a test statement to print out the array so far-
            print t[test], "\n"         #-every time a new array is saved into it
            test+=1
        end
        j+=1
    end
end
print t                                 #prints out at the end, this is always just the last-
                                        #-array printed out fifteen times

whenever i save s into t[j] it saves into and overwrites all instances of t that have been created so far, am i misunderstanding ruby arrays, i assume that t[5] = s and wouldn't affect t[4] or t[3] ect. is there a way to do this in which ruby will only save the array for a specific instance or do i need to go back to C++ for this? the txt file for this is

75
95 64
17 47 82
18 35 87 10
20 04 82 47 65
19 01 23 75 03 34
88 02 77 73 07 63 67
99 65 04 28 06 16 70 92
41 41 26 56 83 40 80 70 33
41 48 72 33 47 32 37 16 94 29
53 71 44 65 25 43 91 52 97 51 14
70 11 33 28 77 73 17 78 39 68 17 57
91 71 52 38 17 14 91 43 58 50 27 29 48
63 66 04 68 89 53 67 30 73 16 69 87 40 31
04 62 98 27 23 09 70 98 73 93 38 53 60 04 23

also found at http://projecteuler.net/problem=18

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is not "over-writing", it is that you only ever create one second-dimension array (which you point s to). So you are writing pointers to the same object into each t[j]

Move s = [] to the point in the code that you wish to start a new second-dimension array.

If you want to keep existing numbers in the array so far, do something like

s = s.clone

. . . which will (shallow) copy existing contents of array to a new one, and point s at it.

share|improve this answer
    
okay got it, so it doesn't set it equal to the value, it just points, that is what i was missing, thank you – elder south Apr 3 '13 at 20:36
    
yes, that's true of all Ruby objects except a very few "immediate" objects. Most notably Ruby's numbers (integers, floats etc) don't work like pointers. The one that catches me out the most is that variables containing String values are pointers – Neil Slater Apr 3 '13 at 20:40

Looks like every element of t will be exactly the same s array, the final t will look something like this:

t[0] ---\
t[1] ----+--> s
t[2] ---/

When you do this:

t[j] = s

all you're doing is assigning a reference to an array to t[j], you're not making a copy of the s array, you're just making another reference to it. The behavior is exactly the same as in C or C++ if s was an array or pointer.

I'm not sure what you're trying to accomplish with t[j] = s but you probably want to assign a copy of s to t[j]:

t[j] = s.dup
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