Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How I can have variable number of parameters in my function in C++.

Analog in C#:

public void Foo(params int[] a) {
    for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
        Console.WriteLine(a[i]);
}

public void UseFoo() {
    Foo();
    Foo(1);
    Foo(1, 2);
}

Analog in Java:

public void Foo(int... a) {
    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
        System.out.println(a[i]);
}

public void UseFoo() {
    Foo();
    Foo(1);
    Foo(2);
}
share|improve this question
4  
As others have pointed out, a variadic function is specifically what you're looking for. But unless you plan on sending a mix of types to the function, you're better off just passing a pointer or reference to a vector containing your parameters instead. –  Richard Simões Oct 16 '09 at 18:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

These are called Variadic functions. Wikipedia lists example code for C++.

To portably implement variadic functions in the C programming language, the standard stdarg.h header file should be used. The older varargs.h header has been deprecated in favor of stdarg.h. In C++, the header file cstdarg should be used.

To create a variadic function, an ellipsis (...) must be placed at the end of a parameter list. Inside the body of the function, a variable of type va_list must be defined. Then the macros va_start(va_list, last fixed param), va_arg(va_list, cast type), va_end(va_list) can be used. For example:

#include <stdarg.h>

double average(int count, ...)
{
    va_list ap;
    int j;
    double tot = 0;
    va_start(ap, count); //Requires the last fixed parameter (to get the address)
    for(j=0; j<count; j++)
        tot+=va_arg(ap, double); //Requires the type to cast to. Increments ap to the next argument.
    va_end(ap);
    return tot/count;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think that example is C.. but close enough. –  Licky Lindsay Oct 16 '09 at 18:48
    
C usually compiles fine in C++ compilers. –  Carl Norum Oct 16 '09 at 18:48
    
I assume it compiles but the use of <stdarg.h> header instead of <cstdarg> flags it as clearly "C". –  Licky Lindsay Oct 16 '09 at 18:55
2  
@Licky: as stated, I copied the code from Wikipedia. And I highlighted the remark that for C++ the cstdarg header should be used. Seems clear to me. –  Stephan202 Oct 16 '09 at 18:59
    
If you use cstdarg, won't that leave va_list etc. in the std namespace? Or are those macros in cstdarg? –  David Thornley Oct 16 '09 at 19:08

See Variadic functions in C, Objective-C, C++, and D

You need to include stdarg.h and then use va_list, va_start, va_arg and va_end, as the example in the Wikipedia article shows. It's a bit more cumbersome than in Java or C#, because C and C++ have only limited built-in support for varargs.

share|improve this answer

Aside from the other answers, if you're just trying to pass an array of integers, why not:

void func(const std::vector<int>& p)
{
    // ...
}

std::vector<int> params;
params.push_back(1);
params.push_back(2);
params.push_back(3);

func(params);

You can't call it in parameter, form, though. You'd have to use any of the variadic function listed in your answers. C++0x will allow variadic templates, which will make it type-safe, but for now it's basically memory and casting.

You could emulate some sort of variadic parameter->vector thing:

// would also want to allow specifying the allocator, for completeness
template <typename T> 
std::vector<T> gen_vec(void)
{
    std::vector<T> result(0);
    return result;
}

template <typename T> 
std::vector<T> gen_vec(T a1)
{
    std::vector<T> result(1);

    result.push_back(a1);

    return result;
}

template <typename T> 
std::vector<T> gen_vec(T a1, T a2)
{
    std::vector<T> result(1);

    result.push_back(a1);
    result.push_back(a2);

    return result;
}

template <typename T> 
std::vector<T> gen_vec(T a1, T a2, T a3)
{
    std::vector<T> result(1);

    result.push_back(a1);
    result.push_back(a2);
    result.push_back(a3);

    return result;
}

// and so on, boost stops at nine by default for their variadic templates

Usage:

func(gen_vec(1,2,3));
share|improve this answer

If you don't care about portability, you could port this C99 code to C++ using gcc's statement expressions:

#include <cstdio>

int _sum(size_t count, int values[])
{
    int s = 0;
    while(count--) s += values[count];
    return s;
}

#define sum(...) ({ \
    int _sum_args[] = { __VA_ARGS__ }; \
    _sum(sizeof _sum_args / sizeof *_sum_args, _sum_args); \
})

int main(void)
{
    std::printf("%i", sum(1, 2, 3));
}

You could do something similar with C++0x' lambda expressions, but the gcc version I'm using (4.4.0) doesn't support them.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.