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I have a string based enum created as a struct:

public struct Version {
    public const string
        Version1 = "Version1",
        Version2 = "Version2";
}

And I try to use it like this:

    public Version curVersion {
        get {
            if (ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["Version"] == "Version1") {
                return Version.Version1;
            }
            return Version.Version2;
        }
    }

However, it's throwing an error on "return Version.Version1;" saying:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'string' to 'Version'

How do I convert?

I have also tried "(Version)return Version.Version1;" and it's the same result except the error dropped the word "implicitly".

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6  
"string based enum created as a struct"?! – wRAR Apr 3 '13 at 20:31
    
you struct doesn't have any field and though meaningless to return it – Lanorkin Apr 3 '13 at 20:31
    
"string based enum created as a struct"?! – Michael Viktor Starberg Apr 3 '13 at 20:32
    
The error Cannot implicitly convert type 'string' to 'Verion' doesn't even match your code....The use of an enumerator doesn't make sense in a case like this. – Ramhound Apr 3 '13 at 20:35
    
"string based enum created as a struct"!!!!! – Yongke Bill Yu Apr 3 '13 at 20:42

If you want to return strings then curVersion should be of type string, not Version.

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But then it doesn't enforce that only those two values are valid values of the object. – Servy Apr 3 '13 at 20:41
    
@Servy sure, but you cannot do that without a proper enum. – wRAR Apr 3 '13 at 20:58
    
Sure you can. Also, who says you can't use a proper enum? See my answer for how either approach can solve the problem. – Servy Apr 3 '13 at 21:00

Your struct is quite meaningless since it doesn't have any instance fields. Cosider changing it into a static class, like this:

public static class Version {
    public const string
        Version1 = "Version1",
        Version2 = "Version2";
}

Then Version1 and Version2 have type string. Maybe your property curVersion should have type string as well then?


If you really want a struct, you can change it into this:

public struct Version {
    public readonly string Text;

    Version(string text) {
        Text = text;
    }

    public static readonly Version Version1 = new Version("Version1");
    public static readonly Version Version2 = new Version("Version2");
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I currently do, I was just hoping there was a way to strongly type my string... guess not. – Yongke Bill Yu Apr 3 '13 at 20:42
    
@YongkeBillYu There most certainly is a way. The easiest of which is to just use an enum. It's literally the exact case they were built for. – Servy Apr 3 '13 at 20:43
    
Yes but they only allow integer! – Yongke Bill Yu Apr 3 '13 at 20:44
    
@YongkeBillYu That doesn't matter. You can leverage ToString to get a string value that represents that enum. Also, it's not just ints, it any integer type, but that's not relevant here. – Servy Apr 3 '13 at 20:45

The appropriate solution in your case would be to just use a regular enum:

enum Version
{
    Version1,
    Version2,
}

If you want to get the string value of a particular enum you can just use ToString:

string s = Version.Version1.ToString();//this will result in the string "Version1"

As for why you're seeing the error you have, Version.Version1, in your code, is not an instance of Version. The variable is of type String. The fact that it's defined in the Version class doesn't make it an instance of Version. You'd need to create a new Version and return that for it to compile.

While you can create your own string-based enum type, there simply is no need. You can just use ToString as I said earlier. If you want to do it anyway though the code might look something like this:

public struct Version
{
    private string value;
    private Version(string value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static readonly Version Version1 = new Version("Version1");
    public static readonly Version Version2 = new Version("Version2");

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return value;
    }
}

You can then take it further to add functionality for parsing, comparing, equality, etc. all based on the underlying string value.

The primary reason to use this custom "string enum" type would be if it's important for the string value of the enum to be different from the variable name used to represent it. This is particularly important if the string value isn't a legal identifier in C# (i.e. something that contains spaces in it) or perhaps just because it's very long and the identifier should be a shorter version of it.

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