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right up front i want to say: please don't suggest alternative solutions, unless you can accomplish it without modifying the Types that are of the pattern BaseXXXXXX

that said, this behavior goes way beyond perplexing as far as I am concerned, it would seem that using the new keyword in order to hide a property in C# means that WinRT XAML (Windows8, Metro, Windows Store App) binding no longer functions correctly. I have no idea why this is.

Here is an example:

C#:

namespace WinRtSandbox
{
    public class BaseClass 
    {
        public string Property1 { get; set; }
        public int[] Property2 { get; set; }
        public object Property3 { get; set; }
    }


    public class ModifiedClass : BaseClass
    {
        public new string Property1 { get; set; }
        public new long[] Property2 { get; set; }
        public new string Property3 { get; set; }
    }

    public sealed partial class MainPage : Page
    {

        public BaseClass Normal { get; set; }
        public ModifiedClass Modified { get; set; }

        public MainPage()
        {
            this.Normal = new BaseClass
            {
                Property1 = "WTF",
                Property2 = new[] { 2, 3, 4 },
                Property3 = "Work?"
            };

            this.Modified = new ModifiedClass
            {
                Property1 = "WTF",
                Property2 = new[] { 2L, 3L, 4L },
                Property3 = "Work?"
            };

            this.InitializeComponent();
        }
    }
}

WinRT XAML:

<Page
    x:Class="WinRtSandbox.MainPage"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:local="using:WinRtSandbox"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}"
    mc:Ignorable="d">

    <Grid Background="{StaticResource ApplicationPageBackgroundThemeBrush}">
        <Border Background="#22000000" Padding="40" Width="400" Height="500">
            <Grid>

                <Grid.Resources>
                    <Style TargetType="Rectangle">
                        <Setter Property="Height" Value="1"/>
                        <Setter Property="HorizontalAlignment" Value="Stretch"/>
                        <Setter Property="Margin" Value="0,15,0,15"/>
                        <Setter Property="Fill" Value="{StaticResource ApplicationForegroundThemeBrush}"/>
                    </Style>
                </Grid.Resources>

                <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                    <ColumnDefinition/>
                    <ColumnDefinition/>
                </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

                <StackPanel Grid.Column="0">

                    <ItemsControl>
                        <TextBlock Text="this.Normal"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="this.Normal.Property1"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="this.Normal.Property2"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="this.Normal.Property3"/>
                    </ItemsControl>

                    <Rectangle Fill="Red"/>

                    <ItemsControl>
                        <TextBlock Text="this.Modified"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="this.Modified.Property1"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="this.Modified.Property2"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="this.Modified.Property3"/>
                    </ItemsControl>

                </StackPanel>

                <StackPanel Grid.Column="1">

                    <ItemsControl DataContext="{Binding Normal}">
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding}"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Property1}"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Property2}"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Property3}"/>
                    </ItemsControl>

                    <Rectangle Fill="Red"/>

                    <ItemsControl DataContext="{Binding Modified}">
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding}"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Property1}"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Property2}"/>
                        <Rectangle/>
                        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Property3}"/>
                    </ItemsControl>

                </StackPanel>
            </Grid>
        </Border>

    </Grid>
</Page>

The all-too-incorrect result looks something like: what is going on

basically, every one of those blank lines should be filled do any of you XAML hotshots have any idea why these bindings are failing and is there anything that can be done to work around what I can only assume is a heinous bug? Any help or insight would be greatly appreciated, thank you in advance... -ck

update: the output dump i forgot

Error: BindingExpression path error: 'Property2' property not found on 'WinRtSandbox.ModifiedClass'. BindingExpression: Path='Property2' DataItem='WinRtSandbox.ModifiedClass'; target element is 'Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.TextBlock' (Name='null'); target property is 'Text' (type 'String')
Error: BindingExpression path error: 'Property3' property not found on 'WinRtSandbox.ModifiedClass'. BindingExpression: Path='Property3' DataItem='WinRtSandbox.ModifiedClass'; target element is 'Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls.TextBlock' (Name='null'); target property is 'Text' (type 'String')

Update:

Bug filed with Microsoft: https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/782993/binding-a-property-that-hides-another-in-winrt-xaml so we'll see how that goes

share|improve this question
1  
Is there anything in the output stating that the binding failed? I assume it's just getting confused since 2 properties of the object have the same name, though I can't find any literature on the subject. –  Kevin DiTraglia Apr 3 '13 at 20:50
    
@KevinDiTraglia sorry i forgot to include the binding dump, thanks for reminding me, the error makes even less sense as it makes it sound like no property of that name exists at all... a conflict message i would at least understand –  ckozl Apr 3 '13 at 20:53
1  
Hmm, something is up. I just loaded your code verbatim and it worked correctly (filled each line with WTF is going on with this). It may be an issue with INotifyPropertyChanged (but I doubt it if you are filling everything in the constructor), or maybe the DataContext of the form is not set to what you think it is? Not sure, but copying what you have into a blank project seems to work for me. Is this .NET 4.0? (Also I used a WPF window, rather than a windows phone page, which may also make a difference?) –  Kevin DiTraglia Apr 3 '13 at 21:01
    
WinRT (Windows 8)... Windows Store Apps, not WPF.... however if this does work in WPF I think this might be some kind of bug in the framework (it's technically .NET 4.5, but it is its own thing...) sorry for not being more clear, i forget not everyone is balls-deep in WinRT (Windows8) like me and are unaware of the new jargon. I edited the question a little for the next person :-D –  ckozl Apr 3 '13 at 21:10
1  
OK I can only confirm that the above code does work in .NET 4.0 in a regular WPF application (usually the 2 are quite similar). Sorry I can't be of more help. –  Kevin DiTraglia Apr 3 '13 at 21:13

2 Answers 2

I agree it does a appear to be a bug.

I know you said you don't want alternatives, but for the sake of anyone else who might read this question, I'll ignore you.

You can fix this is by making the properties each into a DependencyProperty

public class BaseClass : DependencyObject
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty Property1Property = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "Property1",
        typeof(string),
        typeof(BaseClass),
        new PropertyMetadata(null));

    public string Property1
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(Property1Property); }
        set { SetValue(Property1Property, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty Property2Property = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "Property2",
        typeof(int[]),
        typeof(BaseClass),
        new PropertyMetadata(null));

    public int[] Property2
    {
        get { return (int[])GetValue(Property2Property); }
        set { SetValue(Property2Property, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty Property3Property = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "Property3",
        typeof(object),
        typeof(BaseClass),
        new PropertyMetadata(null));

    public object Property3
    {
        get { return GetValue(Property3Property); }
        set { SetValue(Property3Property, value); }
    }
}


public class ModifiedClass : BaseClass
{
    public static readonly new DependencyProperty Property1Property = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "Property1",
        typeof(string),
        typeof(ModifiedClass),
        new PropertyMetadata(null));

    public new string Property1
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(Property1Property); }
        set { SetValue(Property1Property, value); }
    }

    public static readonly new DependencyProperty Property2Property = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "Property2",
        typeof(long[]),
        typeof(ModifiedClass),
        new PropertyMetadata(null));

    public new long[] Property2
    {
        get { return (long[])GetValue(Property2Property); }
        set { SetValue(Property2Property, value); }
    }

    public static readonly new DependencyProperty Property3Property = DependencyProperty.Register(
        "Property3",
        typeof(string),
        typeof(ModifiedClass),
        new PropertyMetadata(null));

    public new string Property3
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(Property3Property); }
        set { SetValue(Property3Property, value); }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
the reason for not modifying the base is because it's part of a different project and can't be modified. if you can modify the base class why would you bother subclassing it and using the new operator? to do so isn't proper, if you can modify the base just make it the right type in the first place. "adding" or "changing" properties on a data transport object for your persistence or UI layer via subclassing particularly in an MVVM pattern is common. Thanks for your effort and time, but this won't help anyone because the ability to modify the base class will already alleviate the issue. –  ckozl May 6 '13 at 12:29
    
@ckozl yes I understood that you didn't want alternatives and guessed it was for that exact reason. Even if you could, I can envision a few reason why you wouldn't just change the base class's type (such as re-purposing a large class you're using extensively elsewhere in the project). –  Murkaeus May 6 '13 at 14:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Turns out this is an "unsupported bug" whatever that means... Here's the direct quote:

Hi, sorry for our late response. We don't support this bug so far. please go to http://support.microsoft.com or call 1-800-MICROSOFT for assistance. Thanks.

... hopefully this will be fixed in .NET 4.5.1

view the bug report on: https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/782993/binding-a-property-that-hides-another-in-winrt-xaml

share|improve this answer

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