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I need to write a function named make_ends that receives one parameter - a list. It returns a new list that contain the first and last items of the input list.

Here is my code, but it doesn't separate it into a list. I'm a little confused about how to go about this. Do I need to use the .join feature? If so, how do I do that? I think I am close.

def make_ends(x):
    return x[0], x[-1]

Here was my earlier build, but it didn't do anything except return the original string:

def go_right(str):
    if str >= 2:
            a = str[-2:0] + str
            return a

What was wrong with that?

Thanks for the help everyone.

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You're close you just need to put x[0] and x[-1] in a list, something like return [x[0],x[-1]] –  Joe Apr 3 '13 at 21:07

6 Answers 6

You're actually very close; the only problem is that you're returning a tuple instead of a list. (Whatever a and b are, a, b is a tuple of those two things, just like [a, b] is a list of those two things.)

One way to solve this is to call list to make a list out of the tuple:

def make_ends(x):
    return list((x[0], x[-1]))

But the easy way to do it is just to create a list in the first place:

def make_ends(x):
    return [x[0], x[-1]]

You then ask another question:

Here was my earlier build, but it didn't do anything except return the original string:

def go_right(str):
    if str >= 2:
            a = str[-2:0] + str
            return a

Let's go through this step by step.

First, str >= 2 is comparing a string to a number. In Python 2.x, either all strings are bigger than all numbers, or all strings are smaller than all numbers. (That's left up to the implementation.) So, this isn't a very useful check.

Maybe you wanted to check if len(str) >= 2 instead? But even then, I'm not sure what that would get you. If the length were 0 or 1, what would you want to do? As it is, you'd return None, which probably isn't right.

Meanwhile, str[-2:0] asks for all elements that come after 2-before-the-end, but before the start. There are no elements before the start, so this is empty. Then you add the original value to this empty collection, so you get the original value.


Also, as a side note, calling a parameter str is a bad idea. Besides the fact that it hides the built-in str (which is a function that turns anything into its string representation), it also strongly implies that what you're dealing with is a string, not a list.

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Why the downvote here? Is there something wrong with the explanation? –  abarnert Apr 3 '13 at 21:10
    
pretty much every answer to this Q got a downvote without explanation. Strange. –  JaredPar Apr 4 '13 at 0:01

Try the following

def make_ends(x):
  return [x[0], x[-1]]

In the current form instead of a list you are creating a tuple. This is what the comma operator does when put between values

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Why did someone downvote this answer? Sure, it doesn't have any additional info that wasn't in the two earlier answers, but there's nothing wrong, misleading, badly-explained or otherwise downvote-worthy here. –  abarnert Apr 3 '13 at 21:09

You're currently returning a tuple, not a list. Simply wrap it in square brackets to make it a list:

def make_ends(x):
    return [x[0], x[-1]]

However, I'd question why you want a list in the first place. You know you're only returning two items, so you don't need it to be mutable - it seems to me perhaps that a tuple is what you want after all here.

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1  
I notice that someone downvoted every answer but this one. Is that because you're the mass-downvoter, or just because you posted your answer after the mass-downvoter showed up? –  abarnert Apr 3 '13 at 21:13
    
Not guilty, your honour! (fwiw, I upvoted your answer...) –  Benjamin Hodgson Apr 3 '13 at 21:14
    
Yeah, it looks like someone just did a drive-by downvote-everything for some reason. While I was adding a comment to JaredPar's answer asking why it was downvoted, someone downvoted my answer. While I was commenting there, someone downvoted the other 3 answers… Oh well, it doesn't make much difference in the long run. –  abarnert Apr 3 '13 at 21:20
    
The question got downvoted too. –  Benjamin Hodgson Apr 3 '13 at 21:22

There are indeed multiple ways of tackling this task

One would be the most common and probably most conventional

def make_ends(x):
    return [x[0], x[-1]]

Another method

def make_ends(x):
    finished = []
    finished.append(x[0])
    finished.append(x[1])
    return finished

Also, you could turn the string into a list, allowing the function to work with strings

def make_ends(x):
    x = list(x)
    return [x[0], x[-1]]
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you're very close. You just have to cast the return into a list.

return [x[0], x[-1]]
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I may be missing something but seems like the downvote was unwarranted. –  GoingTharn Apr 3 '13 at 21:27
    
Agreed. Your answer didn't add anything that wasn't in the first 3, but it's still a perfectly good answer. For some reason, all of the answers got downvotes, and so did the question, with no explanation. I guess it doesn't matter, because they still end up ordered the same way they should have (and I believe you get more rep for an upvote plus a downvote than for no votes at all), but it's still annoying. –  abarnert Apr 4 '13 at 0:16
    
Yeah, I saw the drive-by after I'd posted my comment. It didn't add anything, but was posted at the same time as the others (basically all of them hit at once, since it was a simple q) –  GoingTharn Apr 4 '13 at 15:22
def make_ends(x):
  return [x[0], x[-1]]
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