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I've got a class (node) to which I want to assign a specific set of functions (in this case a1, a2, b1, and b2) based on a parameter of the class (operatingMode).

The situation is that I have a motor that has many different operating modes. Each operating mode allows for certain functions to be performed, but not others. The assignment of functions to various modes is done in a way that does not lend itself nicely to creating classes for each operating mode.

Below is my pass at a solution, but it doesn't work.

Any thoughts?

def a1(self):
    return 'a1'

def a2(self):
    return 'a2'

def b1(self):
    return 'b1'

def b2(self):
    return b2




class node(object):
    def __init__(self,operatingMode):
    self.operatingMode=operatingMode

    if self.operatingMode=='A':
        self.a1function=a1
        self.a2function=a2
        print 'Operating Mode \'A\' functions loaded'

    if self.operatingMode=='B':
        self.b1function=b1
        self.b2function=b2
        print 'Operating Mode \'B\' functions loaded'

    def setOperatingMode(self,operatingMode):
        self.operatingMode=operatingMode
        self.__init__(self,operatingMode)

Running this in my terminal lets me call it, but I have to state elbow twice:

In [65]: elbow=node('A')
Operating Mode 'A' functions loaded

In [66]: elbow.a1function(elbow)
Out[66]: 'a1'

trying to run elbow.setOperatingMode('B') yields an error.

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1  
It's not totally clear what you're trying to achieve, but did you try self.a1function = a1, etc.? –  BrenBarn Apr 3 '13 at 21:17
    
+1 to @BrenBarn. Or, alternatively, maybe self.functions = {}, then self.functions['a1'] = a1function? Without knowing how you're hoping to call these methods, it's hard to say how to do it right. –  abarnert Apr 3 '13 at 21:22
    
On another node: calling __init__ from another method is usually a very bad idea. If you have code that you want called by both __init__ and setOperatingMode, abstract it out into a method they both call (or have __init__ call setOperatingMode instead of the other way around). –  abarnert Apr 3 '13 at 21:23
    
I made the change @BrenBarn mentioned (and updated the code appropriately. I've also added some commands so you can see what I'm trying to do. Thanks for the help. –  Chris Apr 3 '13 at 21:24
    
Is there a reason you can't just define a1function, a2function, etc. as plain old members, and maybe add a precondition check to give you an error when calling in the wrong state? –  abarnert Apr 3 '13 at 21:25
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In response to this comment:

This is for motor control, so I'm trying to limit overhead... operating modes will be changed much more infrequently than individual commands will be called.

Python instances can change their class. You could use this to change operating modes without needing to use an if-clause to check the mode:

class Base(object):
    # Put any methods shared by ANode and BNode here.
    pass

class ANode(Base):
    def a1(self):
        return 'a1'

    def a2(self):
        return 'a2'

class BNode(Base):
    def b1(self):
        return 'b1'

    def b2(self):
        return 'b2'


elbow = ANode()
print(elbow.a1())
# a1

knee = ANode()
print(knee.a1())
# a1

elbow.__class__ = BNode
print(knee.a1())
# a1
print(elbow.b2())
# b2

elbow.a1()
# AttributeError: 'BNode' object has no attribute 'a1'

On the positive side, this is the fastest suggestion I've posted. Notice there are no if-statements in the code above. Once the class changes, all the available methods change along with it "instantly", purely due to normal Python method calling semantics.

If Node is defined as in the decorator solution,

In [33]: elbow = Node('A')

In [34]: %timeit elbow.a1()
1000000 loops, best of 3: 288 ns per loop

While, if knee is defined using ANode,

In [36]: knee = ANode()

In [37]: %timeit knee.a1()
10000000 loops, best of 3: 126 ns per loop

So this solution is more than 2x as fast at calling methods than the decorator solution.

Switching speed is comparable:

In [38]: %timeit elbow.operatingMode = 'B'
10000000 loops, best of 3: 71.7 ns per loop

In [39]: %timeit knee.__class__ = BNode
10000000 loops, best of 3: 78.7 ns per loop

Caveat: One thing that is going to plague all the solutions I've posted is that after a switch the names the the available methods change. That means when you program using these classes, you have to keep track of the state of the instance before you can even know what methods are available. That is awkward.

Your program will be much much simpler if ANode and BNode have exactly the same interface -- all the same attribute and method names -- with just the definitions of those methods to changing (when the mode -- or class -- is changed).


Regarding this comment:

I've got about a hundred functions and 7 operation modes. Of those functions, about 10 are shared between all operation modes, 75 are shared by multiple modes, and 15 are exclusive to a particular mode. The problem is that the 75 aren't allocated to the modes nicely: Some might be in modes 1,4 and 7, others in 2,4,5, and 7, others in 1 and 5.

You can define the methods outside the classes, and then "hook them up" to Mode-based classes like this:

def a1(self):
    return 'a1'

def a2(self):
    return 'a2'

def b1(self):
    return 'b1'

def b2(self):
    return 'b2'

class Base(object):
    # Put the 10 methods share by all modes here
    def common1(self): 
        pass

class ANode(Base):
    a1 = a1
    a2 = a2

class BNode(Base):
    b1 = b1
    b2 = b2

class CNode(Base):
    a1 = a1
    b2 = b2
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This is great. I think this will work perfectly.... Thanks so much –  Chris Apr 4 '13 at 2:40
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Using types.MethodType and __getattr__:

import types

def a1(self):
    return 'a1'

def a2(self):
    return 'a2'

def b1(self):
    return 'b1'

def b2(self):
    return 'b2'

class Node(object):
    def __init__(self, operatingMode):
        self.operatingMode = operatingMode
    def __getattr__(self, attr):
        if self.operatingMode=='A':
            if attr == 'a1function':
                return types.MethodType(a1, self)
            if attr == 'a2function':
                return types.MethodType(a2, self)

        elif self.operatingMode=='B':
            if attr == 'b1function':
                return types.MethodType(b1, self)
            if attr == 'b2function':
                return types.MethodType(b2, self)
        else:
            raise AttributeError()

Then

elbow = Node('A')
print(elbow.a1function())
elbow.operatingMode = 'B'
print(elbow.b2function())

yields

a1
b2
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Perhaps using a checkMode decorator would be a cleaner way -- this avoids __getattr__ and type.MethodType magic:

def checkMode(mode):
    def deco(func):
        def wrapper(self):
            if self.operatingMode == mode:
                return func(self)
            else:
                raise TypeError('Wrong operating Mode')
        return wrapper
    return deco

class Node(object):
    def __init__(self, operatingMode):
        self.operatingMode = operatingMode

    @checkMode('A')
    def a1(self):
        return 'a1'

    @checkMode('A')
    def a2(self):
        return 'a2'

    @checkMode('B')
    def b1(self):
        return 'b1'

    @checkMode('B')
    def b2(self):
        return 'b2'

with the code above, we can do this:

elbow = Node('A')
print(elbow.a1())
# a1

knee = Node('A')
print(knee.a1())
# a1

elbow.operatingMode = 'B'
print(knee.a1())  # knee is still in operatingMode A
# a1

print(elbow.b2())
# b2

elbow.a1()
# TypeError: Wrong operating Mode

Explanation:

The decorator syntax works as follows:

@deco
def func(): ...

is equivalent to

def func(): ...
func = deco(func)

Above, checkMode is a function which returns a decorator, deco. deco then decorates the methods a1, a2, etc., so that

a1 = deco(a1)

Thus, a1 is the func passed to deco. deco(a1), in turn, returns a new method, generically called wrapper. This new method gets assigned to a1 by the statement a1 = deco(a1). So a1 is now the method wrapper. So when you call elbow.a1(), the code in wrapper gets executed.

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This seems to be working pretty well, and about 2x snappier than the method type approach. I'l have to do some digging on decorators to understand them a bit better –  Chris Apr 4 '13 at 0:38
    
You might want to check out the __class__ switching solution then. Calling the methods with that solution is by my measure more than 2x faster than this decorator solution since no if-statement has to be executed. –  unutbu Apr 4 '13 at 1:07
    
Unfortunately my list of functions doesn't break down so nicely that it accomodates discrete classes as shown... which is the impetus for this question in the first place. –  Chris Apr 4 '13 at 1:19
    
Are you sure? It sounds as if you could "generate" the desired classes using mixins. If you can explain more about why the functions can't placed in discrete classes, we might be able to suggest a way around it. –  unutbu Apr 4 '13 at 1:27
    
So I've got about a hundred functions and 7 operation modes. Of those functions, about 10 are shared between all operation modes, 75 are shared by multiple modes, and 15 are exclusive to a particular mode. The problem is that the 75 aren't allocated to the modes nicely: Some might be in modes 1,4 and 7, others in 2,4,5, and 7, others in 1 and 5. It's this structure that has me thinking a single master class where I can include all functions and then filter out which ones are allowed might be best... having the operating mode as a parameter also maps well to my mental model of the system. –  Chris Apr 4 '13 at 1:32
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Your entire design is very bizarre, and you probably need to take a step back and explain what you're trying to do so someone can help you with a better design.

But if you just want to make your design work, there are two problems with your current code:

self.a1function = a1

This sets self.a1function to a regular function, not a bound method. You can explicitly create a bound method like this:

self.a1function=types.MethodType(a1, self, self.__class__)

Or you can set a1function to be a wrapper around a1. Or, more simply, do the wrapping dynamically, which means you can fake the bound-method-ness with a closure, which is arguably more readable:

def __getattr__(self, attr):
    if attr == 'a1function' and self.operating_mode == 'A':
        return lambda: a1(self)

Meanwhile:

trying to run elbow.setOperatingMode('B') yields an error.

You really need to post the traceback, or at least the error string, instead of just saying "yields an error". In this case, it tells you very explicitly what the error is, so you don't need to guess:

TypeError: __init__() takes exactly 2 arguments (3 given)

The problem is that in this line:

self.__init__(self,operatingMode)

… you're passing self twice. It's the object you call the method on, and it's also the first parameter.

Calling __init__ from another method is a bad idea anyway, but if you really want to, it's the same as calling any other method:

self.__init__(operatingMode)
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