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I have written this code to differentiate between spaces and newline characters so that I can compute the length of the whole text from user input. I actually need to compute the length of the text so that I can allocate space for that length in a linked list.

char s[24];
int l=0,i;
scanf("%s",s);
for(i=0;;){
    if(s[i]==' ') {
     l++;
     i++;
    }
    else if (s[i]=='\0') break;
    else {
    l++;
    i++;
    }
}

printf("%d",l);
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Where are you stuck? And do you realise your if and else do the same thing? –  Tim Castelijns Apr 3 '13 at 21:15
    
And your loop is infinite because you commented out the test for s[i]=='\0'. –  Carey Gregory Apr 3 '13 at 21:16
1  
What exactly are you trying to count? The number of non-blank characters in the entire string, or the number of characters in each word? Also, I see no check for newlines but you mention them in the question. Please state exactly what you're trying to count. –  Carey Gregory Apr 3 '13 at 21:17
    
the above commented line is by mistake... –  bak2trak Apr 3 '13 at 21:22
    
now i have edited it... I just wanna know as in c whitespace characters are actually '\0' so how can we differentiate b/w space and newline... –  bak2trak Apr 3 '13 at 21:24

2 Answers 2

You could do it in a very shout piece of code with some functions:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(void)
{
    char s[24];
    fgets(s,24,stdin);
    if( s[strlen(s)-1] == '\n'){
        s[strlen(s)-1] = '\0';
    }
    printf("%lu\n",strlen(s));
    return 0;
}

You should not use scanf. Because meet with space, it stops. And it is unsafe to use scanf(). fgets() is a better choice.

Tested with GCC and Linux.

Update: Thanks to @wildplasser, there was a bug in my code. After fixing the bug, new code without string.h is:

#include <stdio.h>

size_t my_strlen(char * str){
    size_t length = 0;
    while( str[length++] != '\0' ){;}
    return length-1;
}

int main(void)
{
    char s[24];
    size_t len=0;
    if( fgets(s,24,stdin) == NULL ){
        printf("Error in reading string.\n");
        return -1;
    }
    len = my_strlen(s);
    if( len > 0 && s[len-1] == '\n'){
        --len;
    }
    printf("%zd\n",len);
    return 0;
}
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how can we do it without using string.h –  bak2trak Apr 3 '13 at 21:47
1  
s[strlen(s)-1] = 0; is unsafe. strlen() could return 0. (fgets can yield a string starting with '\0' ) Also: calling strlen() twice is not needed. –  wildplasser Apr 3 '13 at 21:49
    
@bak2trak We could write a function to get the length by ourselves. See my update. –  Sheng Apr 3 '13 at 22:02
    
@wildplasser Thanks very much for your comments! I improved my code. Thank you! –  Sheng Apr 3 '13 at 22:06
    
That's much better. Next step would be to use a size_t, not an int for len. –  wildplasser Apr 3 '13 at 22:10

Per the question in your title, <string.h> has a strlen() function that will count the number of characters up to the null terminator in a string. It looks like you may be doing something different in your code, though.

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I am trying to count the number of characters including spaces.forget strlen thats by mistake.. –  bak2trak Apr 3 '13 at 21:26

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