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I've just started learning Code Igniter and I've run in to a problem almost straight away.

Using the code below and a database setup with the correct privileges I get a 500 error (server error). CI is not throwing an error and I can't see anything wrong with this code.

I'm using the latest version of CI and testing this code:

Controller: products.php

class Products extends CI_Controller {

public function index() {
    $this->load->model('products');
    $this->load->view('products');
}
}

Model: products.php

class Products extends CI_Model {
    function __construct() {
        parent::__construct();
    }

    function get_products() {
        $q = $this->db->get('product');
    if($q->num_rows() > 0) {
        foreach ($q->result() as $row) {
            $data[] = $row;
        }
        return $data;
    }
}
}

I've put these classes in the directories they should be in with a filename of the same name as the class....if I comment out the load-model code in the controller my view is shown. My database connections are correct because if I change them to something incorrect CI throws an error. There's some sort of problem with the model or the loading of it.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have conflicting class names, the modell and the controller class both called Products.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes- thanks for the quick reply! – Mike Rifgin Apr 3 '13 at 21:26

Try this:

class Products extends CI_Controller {

public function index() {
    $this->load->model('products_model','products');
    $this->load->view('products');
}
}

Model: products_model.php

class Products extends CI_Model {
                        function __construct() {
            parent::__construct();
    }

    function get_products() {
        $q = $this->db->get('product');
    if($q->num_rows() > 0) {
        foreach ($q->result() as $row) {
            $data[] = $row;
        }
        return $data;
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer

A good convention to use is to name your controller ProductsController and then leave the model Products. So all controllers are SomethingController.

Example:

class ProductsController extends CI_Controller

where the filename become products_controller.php

and the model remains:

class Products extends CI_model

and remains products.php

Now your code should work.

share|improve this answer
    
'ProductsController' would not make much since in the URI. Best practice is to reserve short names for controllers, to eliminate the need for massive routing tables (for SEO sake), and use _model and _library to declare conflicting classes. – BayssMekanique Apr 3 '13 at 21:56
    
If you use proper routing this is not an issue. – Shawn Apr 4 '13 at 3:45
    
?? What do you consider proper routing? – BayssMekanique Apr 4 '13 at 14:58
    
Well you can easily use a regex or wildcard in the routes.php file looking for *Controller. You can also do this in your htaccess files with a regex. The routes.php docs are here: ellislab.com/codeigniter/user-guide/general/routing.html – Shawn Apr 4 '13 at 17:54
    
For example (not tested) something like this in your route $route['([a-z]+)Controller'] = "$1"; – Shawn Apr 4 '13 at 17:59

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