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#include <iostream>
#define _USE_MATH_DEFINES
#include <math.h>

using namespace std;

//the volume and surface area of sphere

struct sphere_t { float radius; }; 
sphere_t sph; 
sph.radius = 3; // this is the part that mess me up, error in sph.radius

double SphereSurfaceArea(const sphere_t &sph)
{
    return 4*M_PI*sph.radius*sph.radius; 
}

double SphereVolume(const sphere_t &sph)
{
    return 4.0/3.0*M_PI*sph.radius*sph.radius*sph.radius;
}

int main()
{

    cout << "Sphere's description: " << sph.radius << endl;
    cout << "Surface Area: " << SphereSurfaceArea(sph) << endl; 
    cout << "Volume :" <<SphereVolume(sph) << endl;

    system("pause");
    return(0);
}

The output I get is:

The solid's description The surface area The volume

How can i put a number in a const function by constant reference and set the function void without return anything?

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closed as not a real question by Cornstalks, Synxis, luser droog, Jon, Graviton Apr 8 '13 at 8:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Can you reformat your question ? It is not understandable for the moment... –  Synxis Apr 3 '13 at 22:06
    
You can't do what you're asking. The only way to get a return value via an argument is if the argument is passed by non-const reference. –  Matt Phillips Apr 3 '13 at 22:07
    
where is sph declared? –  user995502 Apr 3 '13 at 22:07
    
For some reason I very much doubt that you get any output out of the code you've shown us, unless you're referring to compiler output. –  Nik Bougalis Apr 3 '13 at 22:10
    
@stardust_ sphere_t sph; –  Anthon Apr 4 '13 at 5:14

2 Answers 2

You can combine the initialization into one line together with the definition of your global variable:

sphere_t sph = { 3 }; 
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This

sph.radius = 3;

is an assignment statement, it assigns the value of 3 to sph.radius. It's a rule of C++ that assignment statements can only go in functions. You've written one outside of a function.

I would write your code like this

int main()
{
    sphere_t sph; 
    sph.radius = 3;

    cout << "Sphere's description: " << sph.radius << endl; 
    cout << "Surface Area: " << SphereSurfaceArea(sph) << endl; 
    cout << "Volume :" << SphereVolume(sph) << endl;

    system("pause");
    return(0);
}

Now the assignment (and the declaration of sph) are inside the function main.

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