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With this code, which is inside a foreach block:

if (!First)
{
    cmd.Parameters[0].Value = Dept.AccountID;
    cmd.Parameters[1].Value = Dept.AccountName;
    // should this call cmd.Prepare() too?
}

if (First)
{
    cmd.Parameters.Add("@account_id", Dept.AccountID);
    cmd.Parameters.Add("@name",Dept.AccountName); 
    cmd.Prepare();
    First = false;
}

...I added the comment at the end of the "not first" conditon.

Should Prepare() be called each time, or does the call to Prepare() when First is true suffice for each subsequent loop?

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Did you time it with and without? Was one faster than the other? –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 3 '13 at 22:05
    
Yes, "with" takes two shakes of a lamb's tail, and "without" takes three swishes of an agitated bobcat's stumpy tail. Or, to put it more succinctly: No. And you are implying that I should, and that would be the answer to my question, but it's not about that to me - I'm sure the time difference would not be noticed by anybdoy. I'm wondering if it may be beneficial or malevolent to do so. –  B. Clay Shannon Apr 3 '13 at 22:14
    
My point was that you can test it (and there are definitely tools you can use to analyze performance differences that a human wouldn't notice at small scale). Maybe you won't be able to tell the difference, in which case it doesn't really matter. But maybe you will. And that is a better answer for you than someone here suggesting whether you should or shouldn't based on who knows what. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 3 '13 at 22:15
    
Yes, I got your point, but I disagree with what is a better answer. –  B. Clay Shannon Apr 3 '13 at 22:40
    
Then maybe you should phrase your question better. Do you care about performance or do you care about something else? If something else, what specifically? –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 3 '13 at 22:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's sufficient to call cmd.Prepare() once. It doesn't care about the parameter values, just the parameter sizes. Calling it multiple times won't cause problems, but it's not necessary either.

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