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I have a code similar to this one:

class A
{
   public function a()
   {
       echo "I'm at 'a' function of the class 'A'<br>";
   }

    public function b()
   {
       echo "I'm at 'b' function of the class 'A'<br>";
   }
   // ... and several other functions.

   public function z()
   {
       echo "I'm at 'z' function of the class 'A'<br>";
   }

}


class B
{
   public function a()
   {
       echo "I'm at 'a' function of the class 'B'<br>";
   }

    public function b()
   {
       echo "I'm at 'b' function of the class 'B'<br>";
   }
   // ... and several other functions.

   public function z()
   {
       echo "I'm at 'z' function of the class 'B'<br>";
   }

}

class Special
{
    public function construct($param)
    {
         //This code will not work. Is there an alternative?
         $this = new $param;
    }
}

$special = new Special("A");
$special->a();

$special = new Special("B");
$special->b();

Ouput:

    I'm at 'a' function of the class 'A'
    I'm at 'b' function of the class 'B'

The problem is I really would like write a class (at this case Special) that can performs methods from a class passed.

The only ugly way I could think to perform this is for each function that I have on A and B I write a code similar to this one:

public function h()
{
    // $param could be 'A' or 'B';
    $this->param->h();
}

But I really don't like to do this because to every function that I have on 'A' or 'B' class I will need to do this.

The mainly thing I would like is the Special class could run function as if it was the other class passed as argument on the construct method.

How can I countour this problem?

share|improve this question
    
With public static function() you can call internal functions with self:: but static is not recommended to be constantly used, I have experimented with this in the past after posting a question yesterday, I will post what I done when im not mobile.. Should be about 30/40 minutes – Daryl Gill Apr 3 '13 at 23:18
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I see two ways to do this. First is more like a factory pattern and the second uses overloading.

Factory:

class Special
{
    public static function inst($param)
    {
         //This code will not work. Is there an alternative?
        return new $param;
    }
}

$special = Special::inst("A");
$special->a();

$special = Special::inst("B");
$special->b();

http://codepad.viper-7.com/LWl1Sn

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern

In a factory pattern, you return the instance of the class from a static method. Then what the variable has really is a reference to the other classes, you are just using Special to make that instantiation.

The second method keeps the instantiation internal, but uses php's __GET, __SET and __CALL to get/set/call on that object.

class Special
{
    private $internal;

    public function __construct($param)
    {
         $this->internal = new $param;
    }

    public function __get($key)
    {
        return $this->internal->$key;
    }

    public function __set($key,$value)
    {
        $this->internal->$key=$value;
    }

    public function __call($method,$args)
    {
        return call_user_func_array(array($this->internal,$method),$args);
    }

}

$special = new Special("A");
$special->a();

$special = new Special("B");
$special->b();

http://codepad.viper-7.com/AlaR6D

Both should do the same thing with the factory most likely the preferred method.

share|improve this answer
    
Jonathan, very interesting. Elegant. Well I would prefer the first method, but it didn't worked. The second too, worked fine. On the first method, need we change something? If you can put it to work, please post the entire code, because didn't work to me. – GarouDan Apr 3 '13 at 23:36
    
I have updated it and it now works. I didn't make the class static and you would then have to call a static method. The factory pattern is an actual accepted design pattern and I linked to the wikipedia page on it. I originally made a mistake because the constructor can't return a value. – Jonathan Kuhn Apr 3 '13 at 23:38
    
Jonathan, almost there ^^. $special = new Special("A"); returns I'm at 'a' function of the class 'A' on the both methods. Why and how to fix? – GarouDan Apr 3 '13 at 23:48
    
I'm reading the pattern, but looks like a kind of php missing error, with a 'wrong' mapping. Is it possible? – GarouDan Apr 3 '13 at 23:54
    
I don't think I understand the problem. I included a link to both sets of code working. The only problem I see is an issue with the constructor. your class is defined as Class A but it has a method of public function a as well. in older php4, a method with the same name as the class was the constructor. So when you instantiate new A, it also calls the method a. That is why you see "I'm at 'a' function of the class 'A'" twice. – Jonathan Kuhn Apr 3 '13 at 23:56

I think I understand what you mean - you can pass an object as an argument to another class.

Something like this:

class A {
    public function calledByB(){}  
}
class B {

    public function callsA( A $obj ){
        $obj->calledByB();
    }
}


$b = new B();
$b->callsA( new A() );

You create a new instance of an object A and pass that to the method or constructor of another class.

share|improve this answer
    
BotskoNet, I ask sorry, but I didn't understand your answer. Can you explain a bit more? Maybe proposing a Special class? – GarouDan Apr 3 '13 at 23:40
    
It's possible I didn't understand the question. – helion3 Apr 3 '13 at 23:41

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