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I am trying to generate a random number for an int through a method. I know that this cannot be done because an int is a primitive type and I get an int cannot be deferenced error. Is there is away around it to where I can still use the method to get the value for the int?


public int move()
 {
     Random random = new Random();
     int generatedNum = random.nextInt(7 - 1) + 1;

     return generatedNum;
 }

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int player1 = 0;
    int player2 = 0;

    player1 = player1.move();
    player2 = player2.move();

}
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closed as too broad by John3136, Beryllium, Alex, Aniket Kulkarni, Liath Apr 1 at 6:34

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Sorry, don't get your question. –  David Apr 3 '13 at 23:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What are you trying to do? This would work, but no idea if it is what you want...

// made this static so you don't need a class reference
public static int move()
 {
     Random random = new Random();
     int generatedNum = random.nextInt(7 - 1) + 1;

     return generatedNum;
 }

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    int player1 = 0;
    int player2 = 0;

    // Now we just call the static method move to set the ints.
    player1 = move();
    player2 = move();

}
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int is a primitive type and Integer is final, so no, you will never be able to write 5.move(). You could write a class that just wraps an integer, but will not be able to do arithmetics with it.

Maybe Iterator<Integer> is an interface worth implementing.

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You can create your own class similar to the Integer class (which is unfortunately final or you'd be able to subclass that). Then add whatever methods you'd like to that class. A little inconvenient to use when you want to retrieve the value, but not too messy.

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Which is fortunately final, thus enforcing immutability. –  MouseEvent Apr 3 '13 at 23:40
    
@MouseEvent - Depends on how you look at it. There are other ways to crack that nut. –  Hot Licks Apr 4 '13 at 0:12

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