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I’m looking for the best practice of how to bind to a service property in AngularJS.

I have worked through multiple examples to understand how to bind to properties in a service that is created using AngularJS.

Below I have two examples of how to bind to properties in a service; they both work. The first example uses basic bindings and the second example used $scope.$watch to bind to the service properties

Are either of these example preferred when binding to properties in a service or is there another option that I’m not aware of that would be recommended?

The premise of these examples is that the service should updated its properties “lastUpdated” and “calls” every 5 seconds. Once the service properties are updated the view should reflect these changes. Both these example work successfully; I wonder if there is a better way of doing it.

Basic Binding

The following code can be view and ran here: http://plnkr.co/edit/d3c16z

<html>
<body ng-app="ServiceNotification" >

    <div ng-controller="TimerCtrl1" style="border-style:dotted"> 
        TimerCtrl1 <br/>
        Last Updated: {{timerData.lastUpdated}}<br/>
        Last Updated: {{timerData.calls}}<br/>
    </div>

    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.5/angular.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var app = angular.module("ServiceNotification", []);

        function TimerCtrl1($scope, Timer) {
            $scope.timerData = Timer.data;
        };

        app.factory("Timer", function ($timeout) {
            var data = { lastUpdated: new Date(), calls: 0 };

            var updateTimer = function () {
                data.lastUpdated = new Date();
                data.calls += 1;
                console.log("updateTimer: " + data.lastUpdated);

                $timeout(updateTimer, 5000);
            };
            updateTimer();

            return {
                data: data
            };
        });
    </script>
</body>
</html>

The other way I solved binding to service properties is to use $scope.$watch in the controller.

$scope.$watch

The following code can be view and ran here: http://plnkr.co/edit/dSBlC9

<html>
<body ng-app="ServiceNotification">
    <div style="border-style:dotted" ng-controller="TimerCtrl1">
        TimerCtrl1<br/>
        Last Updated: {{lastUpdated}}<br/>
        Last Updated: {{calls}}<br/>
    </div>

    <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/angularjs/1.0.5/angular.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        var app = angular.module("ServiceNotification", []);

        function TimerCtrl1($scope, Timer) {
            $scope.$watch(function () { return Timer.data.lastUpdated; },
                function (value) {
                    console.log("In $watch - lastUpdated:" + value);
                    $scope.lastUpdated = value;
                }
            );

            $scope.$watch(function () { return Timer.data.calls; },
                function (value) {
                    console.log("In $watch - calls:" + value);
                    $scope.calls = value;
                }
            );
        };

        app.factory("Timer", function ($timeout) {
            var data = { lastUpdated: new Date(), calls: 0 };

            var updateTimer = function () {
                data.lastUpdated = new Date();
                data.calls += 1;
                console.log("updateTimer: " + data.lastUpdated);

                $timeout(updateTimer, 5000);
            };
            updateTimer();

            return {
                data: data
            };
        });
    </script>
</body>
</html>

I’m aware that I can use $rootscope.$broadcast in the service and $root.$on in the controller, but in other examples that I’ve created that use $broadcast/$on the first broadcast is not captured by the controller, but additional calls that are broadcasted are triggered in the controller. If you are aware of a way to solve $rootscope.$broadcast problem, please provide an answer.

But to restate what I mentioned earlier, I would like to know the best practice of how to bind to a service properties.


Update

This question was originally asked and answered in April 2013. In May 2014, Gil Birman provided a new answer, which I changed as the correct answer. Since Gil Birman answer has very few up-votes, my concern is that people reading this question will disregard his answer in favor of other answers with much more votes. Before you make a decision on what's the best answer, I highly recommend Gil Birman's answer.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Your second approach (and Josh David Miller's answer) is incorrect. Please consider some pros and cons of the second approach:

  • 0 {{lastUpdated}} instead of {{timerData.lastUpdated}}, which could just as easily be {{timer.lastUpdated}}, which I might argue is more readable (but let's not argue... I'm giving this point a neutral rating so you decide for yourself)

  • +1 It may be convenient that the controller acts as a sort of API for the markup such that if somehow the structure of the data model changes you can (in theory) update the controller's API mappings without touching the html partial.

  • -1 However, theory isn't always practice and I usually find myself having to modify markup and controller logic when changes are called for, anyway. So the extra effort of writing the API negates it's advantage.

  • -1 Furthermore, this approach isn't very DRY.

  • -1 If you want to bind the data to ng-model your code become even less DRY as you have to re-package the $scope.scalar_values in the controller to make a new REST call.

  • -0.1 There's a tiny performance hit creating extra watcher(s). Also, if data properties are attached to the model that don't need to be watched in a particular controller they will create additional overhead for the deep watchers.

  • -1 What if multiple controllers need the same data models? That means that you have multiple API's to update with every model change.

$scope.timerData = Timer.data; is starting to sound mighty tempting right about now... Let's dive a little deeper into that last point... What kind of model changes were we talking about? A model on the back-end (server)? Or a model which is created and lives only in the front-end? In either case, what is essentially the data mapping API belongs in the front-end service layer, (an angular factory or service). (Note that your first example--my preference-- doesn't have such an API in the service layer, which is fine because it's simple enough it doesn't need it.)

In conclusion, everything does not have to be decoupled. And as far as decoupling the markup entirely from the data model, the drawbacks outweigh the advantages.


Controllers, in general shouldn't be littered with $scope = injectable.data.scalar's. Rather, they should be sprinkled with $scope = injectable.data's, promise.then(..)'s, and $scope.complexClickAction = function() {..}'s

As an alternative approach to achieve data-decoupling and thus view-encapsulation, the only place that it really makes sense to decouple the view from the model is with a directive. But even there, don't $watch scalar values in the controller or link functions. That won't save time or make the code any more maintainable nor readable. It won't even make testing easier since robust tests in angular usually test the resulting DOM anyway. Rather, in a directive demand your data API in object form, and favor using just the $watchers created by ng-bind.

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More I've been working with AngularJS the more I understand. I believe that AngularJS controllers should be as simple and thin as possible. By adding $watches in the controller it over complicates the logic. By just referencing the value in the service it is much simpler and seems to be more of the AngularJS way. – –  BarDev Jun 12 at 15:13
2  
The "ten commandments" of AngularJS. It is declarative for a reason. –  pilau Aug 6 at 9:37

From my perspective, $watch would be the best practice way.

You can actually simplify your example a bit:

function TimerCtrl1($scope, Timer) {
  $scope.$watch( function () { return Timer.data; }, function (data) {
    $scope.lastUpdated = data.lastUpdated;
    $scope.calls = data.calls;
  }, true);
}

That's all you need.

Since the properties are updated simultaneously, you only need one watch. Also, since they come from a single, rather small object, I changed it to just watch the Timer.data property. The last parameter passed to $watch tells it to check for deep equality rather than just ensuring that the reference is the same.


To provide a little context, the reason I would prefer this method to placing the service value directly on the scope is to ensure proper separation of concerns. Your view shouldn't need to know anything about your services in order to operate. The job of the controller is to glue everything together; its job is to get the data from your services and process them in whatever way necessary and then to provide your view with whatever specifics it needs. But I don't think its job is to just pass the service right along to the view. Otherwise, what's the controller even doing there? The AngularJS developers followed the same reasoning when they chose not to include any "logic" in the templates (e.g. if statements).

To be fair, there are probably multiple perspectives here and I look forward to other answers.

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3  
Can you elaborate a bit? Do you prefer the $watches because the view is less coupled to the service? I.e., {{lastUpdated}} vs. {{timerData.lastUpdated}} –  Mark Rajcok Apr 4 '13 at 0:27
    
@MarkRajcok - You're right. I was far too vague. I updated the answer to include my rationale, but your suspicions were right on - it's entirely about decoupling for me. –  Josh David Miller Apr 4 '13 at 0:34
2  
@BarDev, to use Timer.data in a $watch, Timer has to be defined on the $scope, because the string expression you pass to $watch is evaluated against the scope. Here is a plunker that shows how to make that work. The objectEquality parameter is documented here -- 3rd parameter -- but not really explained too well. –  Mark Rajcok Apr 5 '13 at 21:20
2  
Performance wise, $watch is quite inefficient. See answers at stackoverflow.com/a/17558885/932632 and stackoverflow.com/questions/12576798/… –  Krym Apr 11 at 10:57
4  
@Kyrm That's probably true in some circumstances, but when dealing with performance we need to look for the "clinically significant" performance enhancements, rather than just the statistically significant, generalized ones. If there is a performance problem in an existing application, then it should be addressed. Otherwise, it's just a case of premature optimization, which leads to harder-to-read, bug-prone code that doesn't follow best practices and which has no demonstrated benefit. –  Josh David Miller Apr 11 at 22:54

I think this question has a contextual component.

If you're simply pulling data from a service & radiating that information to it's view, I think binding directly to the service property is just fine. I don't want to write a lot of boilerplate code to simply map service properties to model properties to consume in my view.

Further, performance in angular is based on two things. The first is how many bindings are on a page. The second is how expensive getter functions are. Misko talks about this here

If you need to perform instance specific logic on the service data (as opposed to data massaging applied within the service itself), and the outcome of this impacts the data model exposed to the view, then I would say a $watcher is appropriate, as long as the function isn't terribly expensive. In the case of an expensive function, I would suggest caching the results in a local (to controller) variable, performing your complex operations outside of the $watcher function, and then binding your scope to the result of that.

As a caveat, you shouldn't be hanging any properties directly off your $scope. The $scope variable is NOT your model. It has references to your model.

In my mind, "best practice" for simply radiating information from service down to view:

function TimerCtrl1($scope, Timer) {
  $scope.model = {timerData: Timer.data};
};

And then your view would contain {{model.timerData.lastupdated}}.

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careful with that suggestion, someone not expert in javascript could try to do that with a property that is a string. In that case javascript doesn't make a reference to the object, but raw copies the string. (and that's bad cause it doesn't get updated, if it changes) –  Valerio Coltrè Jul 4 '13 at 15:23
6  
Did I not cover that with my 'caveat' that you should always use the dot (meaning don't hang it off $scope, but off $scope.model). If you have $scope.model.someStringProperty, and you reference model.someStringProperty in your view, it WILL get updated, because the internal watchers will be on the object, not the prop. –  Scott Silvi Jul 8 '13 at 16:43

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