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So, I'm relatively new to javascript, and still having trouble getting my head round variable scope. So, what I'm trying to do is access a variable from outside a function (all within the same object).

See below:

function GameCard(imageSource, div)
{
    this.cardImage = new Image();
    this.cardImage.src = imageSource;

    this.imageString = "<img src='" + this.cardImage.src + "' />";

    this.hiddenImage = new Image();
    this.hiddenImage.src = HIDDEN_SOURCE;

    this.clicked = false;

    this.cardDiv = div;

    $(this.cardDiv).click(function() {
        alert(this.imageString);
        $(this).flip({
            direction:'lr',
        });
    });
}

The alert (my unfortunate debugging) is saying imageString is undefined within the click handler function. Which makes sense, how would I access it?

Thanks in advance, J

share|improve this question
    
Its probably a scope issue with your this.... –  cclerville Apr 4 '13 at 0:26
    
cclerville is correct, when you use 'this' inside the .click() function it is actually referring to the 'cardDiv' object that was clicked, not the encapsulating 'GameCard' object. –  TheManWithNoName Apr 4 '13 at 0:30

3 Answers 3

Two ways: first, you can stash this in another variable:

var saveThis = this;

before setting up the "click" handler, and then use "saveThis" in the handler code:

$(this.cardDiv).click(function() {
    alert(saveThis.imageString);
    $(saveThis).flip({
        direction:'lr',
    });
});

Second way: bind the handler function to the object you want:

$(this.cardDiv).click(function() {
    alert(this.imageString);
    $(this).flip({
        direction:'lr',
    });
}.bind(this));

That second way requires a shim in older IE versions.

share|improve this answer
    
This works, thank you. Just to clarify (if you don't mind) can you explain what was happening? I think I understand @Moby's explanation. Just a bit tangled in my head. –  JohnW Apr 4 '13 at 0:34
    
The "magic" pseudo-variable this gets a value upon each function invocation. The value it gets depends on the circumstances of the function call. In your case, jQuery always tries to make sure that this will be the element involved in the event ("click" in this case). Using either technique above, you override that behavior. –  Pointy Apr 4 '13 at 0:35

In this case "this" refers to $(this.cardDiv) and not the parent object.

You might consider having a javascript object containing all the data outside of your CardGame object

That way the data will be scoped higher up and accessible from within your method

share|improve this answer

Declare a var of imageString outside of the function and use it in both GameCard and the anonymous click() event's function.

The two functions don't share memory spaces, as the anonymous function is not executed in the context of GameCard, but they both share the global variables declared outside.

share|improve this answer
    
If taking this route one should be careful of polluting the global namespace, especially if you have multiple instances of GameCard objects. –  TheManWithNoName Apr 4 '13 at 0:34
    
I agree. Just trying to keep the answer simplistic. –  Moby's Stunt Double Apr 4 '13 at 0:36

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