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I have a class that contains a static dictionary:

class MyClass:
    my_dict = {}
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
        MyClass.my_dict[self.name] = []
    def __call__(self, data):
        MyClass.my_dict[self.name].append(data)

Whenever I want to update the dictionary, I have to use MyClass.my_dict[key], but I'd like the class itself to support item assignment so I can just use MyClass[key] to do the same thing. Is there a way to do this? I'm using Python 2.7.

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1  
Have you looked at overriding - __setitem__ and __getitem__ ? –  Jon Clements Apr 4 '13 at 0:54
    
@Jon Clements - Can you do that to a class itself or only to an instance? –  John Peter Thompson Garcés Apr 4 '13 at 0:55
    
Only to an instance... –  Jon Clements Apr 4 '13 at 0:55
1  
I found a relevant answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/6187932/… –  John Peter Thompson Garcés Apr 4 '13 at 1:12

1 Answer 1

So, here's what I ended up doing:

class MyClassType(type):
    my_dict = {}
    def __getitem__(cls, key):
        return cls.my_dict[key]
    def __setitem__(cls, key, value):
        cls.my_dict[key] = value
    def __str__(cls):
        return cls.my_dict.__str__()
    def iteritems(cls):
        return cls.my_dict.iteritems()

class MyClass(object):
    __metaclass__ = MyClassType
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.name = name
        MyClass[self.name] = []
    def __call__(self, data):
        MyClass[self.name].append(data)
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