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I am looking for a better way to implement this sort of logic:

if not a():
    if not b():
        c()
        b()
    a()

Another form:

try:
   a()
except:
   try:
      b()
      a()
   except:
      c()
      b()
      a()

In words, "Try to run A. If we can't do A, we need to do B first. If we can't do B, we need to do C first, etc."

share|improve this question
    
You are running a and b in the exception block that gets run after they have raised an exception. This smells like a bad idea to me. – tcaswell Apr 4 '13 at 0:57
    
So if a() fails, b() might succeed in some way that enables a() to run ? That makes me cringe... What's the exact use-case you have in mind? – Jon Clements Apr 4 '13 at 0:58
2  
What is your exact problem/situation? – Blender Apr 4 '13 at 0:58
1  
I think I can think of an example: a tries to open a file, b fixes permissions if you don't have access. – Barmar Apr 4 '13 at 1:00
1  
Why don't you just test explicitly for the presence of the repo, etc., and then explicitly do the options that are needed based on the state you find? That is, don't even attempt to check status until you've verified the repo exists. That way if an error is raised it will be a real error and you can just let it propagate. – BrenBarn Apr 4 '13 at 1:08
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure if you feel 'better' about this one; here is an alternative. I believe some people like it and some people don't.

a() or (b(),a())[0] or (c(),b(),a())[0]

Here is validation test:

def a(ret):
    print 'run a, a succeeded?', ret
    return ret

def b(ret):
    print 'run b, b succeeded?', ret
    return ret

def c(ret):
    print 'run c, c succeeded?', ret
    return ret

And

a(False) or (b(False),a(False))[0] or (c(True),b(False),a(False))[0]

gives

run a, a succeeded? False
run b, b succeeded? False
run a, a succeeded? False
run c, c succeeded? True
run b, b succeeded? False
run a, a succeeded? False

And

a(False) or (b(True),a(False))[0] or (c(True),b(True),a(False))[0]

gives

run a, a succeeded? False
run b, b succeeded? True
run a, a succeeded? False
share|improve this answer

How about:

while not a():
    while not b():
        c()

This only works as long as c() is expected to eventually make b() succeed (likewise for b() and a()), but this is a relatively common pattern for me.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this, but if for some reason a or b always fail, we get an infinite loop. – Jace Browning Apr 4 '13 at 1:34

Create a function like fallback_until_success(func_list), where func_list = [a, b, c]. If you have arguments, you can bind them e.g. by passing tuples of (func, *args, **kwargs).

Then you can go through the list in a while loop (including fallback-backtracking per iteration) until you get a success or hit the end of the list; if you dont get a success, return the last exception (or a list of exceptions).

However, this seems like a case where having an initial test to inform your code path is better than trying to do the damage first and backtracking. What you are doing is abusing exceptions as a message-passing service.

Update: well its too late now anyway, but here is a concrete example:

def fallback_until_success(func_list):
    index = 0
    results = []
    exceptions = []
    while (index < len(func_list)):
        try:
            print func_list[index::-1] # debug printing
            for func_spec in func_list[index::-1]:
                #func, args, kwargs = func_spec  # args variant
                #result = func(*args, **kwargs)
                func = func_spec 
                result = func()
                results.append(result)
            break
        except Exception, e:
            exceptions.append(e)
            index += 1
            results = []
            continue
        break
    return results, exceptions

# global "environment" vars
D = {
        "flag1": False,
        "flag2": False,
    }

def a():
    if not D["flag1"]:
        failstr = "a(): failure: flag1 not set"
        print failstr
        raise Exception(failstr)
    print "a(): success"
    return D["flag1"]

def b():
    if not D["flag2"]:
        failstr = "b(): failure: flag2 not set"
        print failstr
        raise Exception(failstr)
    else:
        D["flag1"] = True
        print "b(): success"
    return D["flag2"]

def c():
    D["flag2"] = True
    print "c(): success"
    return True

# args variant
#results, exceptions = fallback_until_success([(a, [], {}), (b, [], {}), (c, [], {})])

results, exceptions = fallback_until_success([a, b, c])
print results
print exceptions

The output:

[<function a at 0x036C6F70>]
a(): failure: flag1 not set
[<function b at 0x03720430>, <function a at 0x036C6F70>]
b(): failure: flag2 not set
[<function c at 0x037A1A30>, <function b at 0x03720430>, <function a at 0x036C6F70>]
c(): success
b(): success
a(): success
[True, True, True]
[Exception('a(): failure: flag1 not set',), Exception('b(): failure: flag2 not set',)]

Of course, this is based on exceptions, but you could modify this to base success/failure on return values also.

share|improve this answer
1  
What if the initial test takes a "long" time? – Jace Browning Apr 4 '13 at 1:08
2  
Does my answer not make sense? The solution I have proposed is basically syntactic sugar for the try-except chain you posted in your answer. Not sure why you think it would be any slower? – Preet Kukreti Apr 4 '13 at 1:17
    
I was responding to your "However..." paragraph. I think the first part of your answer is right, but I don't see where it will backtrack to retry earlier items in func_list. – Jace Browning Apr 4 '13 at 1:24
1  
@JaceBrowning see my update. – Preet Kukreti Apr 4 '13 at 2:14

This should work. Note that it if a fails, it will execute b,c,a. If b then fails, it will execute c,a,b -- that is, not in original order but should be good if order isn't of any particular preference.

ops = [a,b,c]

while op = ops.pop(0):
  if (op()): 
    continue
  ops.append(op)
share|improve this answer

Based on Shao-Chuan Wang's answer, I think I might end up doing something like this:

any(all((a())),
    all((b(), a())),
    all((c(), b(), a())))
share|improve this answer

Why expose all of that to the caller? Caller shouldn't know/care about the details of how a widget works.. Why not insulate the client code from the "guts" by doing something like:

do_stuff()  # This is the only call you make directly

def do_stuff():
    ## commands for Step A, in this case
    ## try to update the changeset
    result = False
    # Do stuff and store result
    if (result == False):
        result = step_B()
    return result

def step_B():
    ## Commands for Step B, in this case
    ## try to pull the repository
    result = False
    # Do stuff and store the result
    if (result == False):
        result = step_C()
    return result

def step_C():
    ## Commands for Step C, in this case
    ## try to clone the repository
    ## and set `result' to True or False
    result = False
    # Do stuff and set `result'
    return result
share|improve this answer

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