Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm struggling with that, since I'm sure that a dozen for-loops is not the solution for this problem:

There is a sorted list of numbers like

numbers = [123, 124, 128, 160, 167, 213, 215, 230, 245, 255, 257, 400, 401, 402, 430]

and I want to create a dict with lists of numbers, wherein the difference of the numbers (following each other) is not more than 15. So the output would be this:

clusters = {
    1 : [123, 124, 128],
    2 : [160, 167],
    3 : [213, 215, 230, 245, 255, 257],
    4 : [400, 401, 402],
    5 : [430]
}

My current solution is a bit ugly (I have to remove duplicates at the end…), I'm sure it can be done in a pythonic way.

This is what I do now:

clusters = {}  
dIndex = 0 
for i in range(len(numbers)-1) :
    if numbers[i+1] - numbers[i] <= 15 :
        if not clusters.has_key(dIndex) : clusters[dIndex] = []
        clusters[dIndex].append(numbers[i])
        clusters[dIndex].append(numbers[i+1])
    else : dIndex += 1
share|improve this question
    
K-means clustering will probably be useful in this case. –  Blender Apr 4 '13 at 1:10
    
defaultdict would make your code a bit simpler –  tcaswell Apr 4 '13 at 1:13
    
Thanks, I'll have a look at both! –  septi Apr 4 '13 at 1:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not strictly necessary if your list is small, but I'd probably approach this in a "stream-processing" fashion: define a generator that takes your input iterable, and yields the elements grouped into runs of numbers differing by <= 15. Then you can use that to generate your dictionary easily.

def grouper(iterable):
    prev = None
    group = []
    for item in iterable:
        if not prev or item - prev <= 15:
            group.append(item)
        else:
            yield group
            group = [item]
        prev = item
    if group:
        yield group

numbers = [123, 124, 128, 160, 167, 213, 215, 230, 245, 255, 257, 400, 401, 402, 430]
dict(enumerate(grouper(numbers), 1))

prints:

{1: [123, 124, 128],
 2: [160, 167],
 3: [213, 215, 230, 245, 255, 257],
 4: [400, 401, 402],
 5: [430]}

As a bonus, this lets you even group your runs for potentially-infinite lists (as long as they're sorted, of course). You could also stick the index generation part into the generator itself (instead of using enumerate) as a minor enhancement.

share|improve this answer
    
WOW, really cool function! I was lookig just for that. Thanks @tzaman –  otmezger Apr 18 '13 at 9:55
import itertools
import numpy as np

numbers = np.array([123, 124, 128, 160, 167, 213, 215, 230, 245, 255, 257, 400, 401, 402, 430])
nd = [0] + list(np.where(np.diff(numbers) > 15)[0] + 1) + [len(numbers)]

a, b = itertools.tee(nd)
next(b, None)
res = {}
for j, (f, b) in enumerate(itertools.izip(a, b)):
    res[j] = numbers[f:b]

If you can use itertools and numpy. Adapted pairwise for the iterator tricks. The +1 is needed to shift the index, adding the 0 and len(numbers) onto the list makes sure the first and last entries are included correctly.

You can obviously do this with out itertools, but I like tee.

share|improve this answer

Using the generator to separate the logic: (one function does one thing)

numbers = [123, 124, 128, 160, 167, 213, 215, 230, 245, 255, 257, 400, 401, 402, 430]

def cut_indices(numbers):
    # this function iterate over the indices that need to be 'cut'
    for i in xrange(len(numbers)-1):
        if numbers[i+1] - numbers[i] > 15:
            yield i+1

def splitter(numbers):
    # this function split the original list into sublists.
    px = 0
    for x in cut_indices(numbers):
        yield numbers[px:x]
        px = x
    yield numbers[px:]

def cluster(numbers):
    # using the above result, to form a dict object.
    cluster_ids = xrange(1,len(numbers))
    return dict(zip(cluster_ids, splitter(numbers)))

print cluster(numbers)

The above codes give me

{1: [123, 124, 128], 2: [160, 167], 3: [213, 215, 230, 245, 255, 257], 4: [400, 401, 402], 5: [430]}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.