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I was trying to run the following,

type
  Vector = array [1..4] of Single;

{$CODEALIGN 16}
function add4(const a, b: Vector): Vector; register; assembler;
asm
  movaps xmm0, [a]
  movaps xmm1, [b]
  addps xmm0, xmm1
  movaps [@result], xmm0
end;

It gives Access Violation on movaps, as far as I know, the movaps can be trusted if the memory location is 16-align. It works no problem if movups (no align is needed).

So my question is, in Delphi XE3, {$CODEALIGN} seems not working in this case.

EDIT

Very strange... I tried the following.

program Project3;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  windows;  // if not using windows, no errors at all

type
  Vector = array [1..4] of Single;

function add4(const a, b: Vector): Vector;
asm
  movaps xmm0, [a]
  movaps xmm1, [b]
  addps xmm0, xmm1
  movaps [@result], xmm0
end;

procedure test();
var
  v1, v2: vector;
begin
  v1[1] := 1;
  v2[1] := 1;
  v1 := add4(v1,v2);  // this works
end;

var
  a, b, c: Vector;

begin
  {$ifndef cpux64}
    {$MESSAGE FATAL 'this example is for x64 target only'}
  {$else}
  test();
  c := add4(a, b); // throw out AV here
  {$endif}
end.

If 'use windows' is not added, everything is fine. If 'use window', then it will throw out exception at c := add4(a, b) but not in test().

Who can explain this?

EDIT it all makes sense to me, now. the conclusions for Delphi XE3 - 64-bit are

  1. stack frames at X64 are set to 16-byte (as required), {$CODEALIGN 16} aligns code for proc/fun to 16 byte.
  2. the dynamic array lives in heap, which can be set to align 16 using SetMinimumBlockAlignment(mba16byte)
  3. however, the stack vars are not always 16-byte aligned, for example, if you declare a integer var before v1, v2 in the above example, e.g. test(), the example will not work.
share|improve this question
1  
CODEALIGN aligns code. If you want to align data you can use the ALIGN directive. – Michael Apr 4 '13 at 5:14
1  
i tried {$ALIGN 16} as well, and it is not working. – SteakOverCooked Apr 4 '13 at 11:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need your data to be 16 byte aligned. That requires some care and attention. You can make sure that the heap allocator aligns to 16 bytes. But you cannot make sure that the compiler will 16 byte align your stack allocated variables because your array has an alignment property of 4, the size of its elements. And any variables declared inside other structures will also have 4 byte alignment. Which is a tough hurdle to clear.

I don't think you can solve your problem in the currently available versions of the compiler. At least not unless you forgo stack allocated variables which I'd guess to be too bitter a pill to swallow. You might have some luck with an external assembler. U

share|improve this answer
    
OK... is it easier to do so in C++? – SteakOverCooked Apr 4 '13 at 20:33
1  
The MS compiler doesn't allow 64 bit inline asm. I expect gcc does. And I'm sure gcc will give you the ability to align stack variables. – David Heffernan Apr 4 '13 at 20:35
    
Very strange behavior, please have a look at my latest edits. – SteakOverCooked Apr 5 '13 at 13:38
    
Not strange at all. Your array has 4 byte alignment. By chance it might land on 16 boundary. And then the code works. By chance. – David Heffernan Apr 5 '13 at 14:03
1  
Because changing the code changes where the globals happen to be located. The locals in test fun probably work everytime because the stack is 16 byte aligned. But again, code changes could break that. – David Heffernan Apr 5 '13 at 14:52

Use this to make the built-in memory manager allocate with 16-byte alignment:

SetMinimumBlockAlignment(mba16Byte);

Also, as far as I know, both "register" and "assembler" are redundant directives so you can skip those from your code.

--

Edit: you mention this is for x64. I just tried the following in Delphi XE2 compiled for x64 and it works here.

program Project3;

type
  Vector = array [1..4] of Single;

function add4(const a, b: Vector): Vector;
asm
  movaps xmm0, [a]
  movaps xmm1, [b]
  addps xmm0, xmm1
  movaps [@result], xmm0
end;

procedure f();
var
  v1,v2 : vector;
begin
  v1[1] := 1;
  v2[1] := 1;
  v1 := add4(v1,v2);
end;

begin
  {$ifndef cpux64}
  {$MESSAGE FATAL 'this example is for x64 target only'}
  {$else}
  f();
  {$endif}
end.
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your solution, and it doesn't work. As far as I can see, the implementation of SetMinimumBlockAlignment has no effects under 64-bit, It has a comment {16-byte alignment is required under 64-bit.}. – SteakOverCooked Apr 4 '13 at 11:16
    
@DoctorLai See my edit. Does it not work for you? – Ville Krumlinde Apr 4 '13 at 12:17
    
no, it doesn't work on my PC, it throws Access Violation exception. – SteakOverCooked Apr 4 '13 at 13:08
1  
This only works if the data lives in a correctly aligned structure. You need 16 byte alignment as well as memory manager support. Also your example uses stack variables. They cannot be 16 byte aligned I think. – David Heffernan Apr 4 '13 at 20:14
1  
@DoctorLai What is your real task? Significant gain with SSE is achieved usually for treatment of big data arrays. It is not difficult to allocate them dynamically. – MBo Apr 5 '13 at 2:40

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