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I'm completely new to programming and am trying to create a Poker program in Java.

This bit of code is in the Player class, where I'm trying to construct an empty hand. No matter how I fill the array (with a loop, like this, etc.), Eclipse tells me I have a null pointer when I try to call a method on hand[1] or hand[ i ] or whatever.

Usually, there aren't any compile-time errors. But when I construct each card in the hand individually––see below––the compiler gets upset...

Relevant fragments of Player and Class below.

What am I doing wrong? I've searched quite a bit and still don't understand.
Thank you in advance!

class Player {

// Sets up a blank card array called "hand"
// with five (0,0) slots for real cards.
private Card[] hand = new Card[5];

private Card hand[0] = new Card(0, 0);  // error: syntax error on token "0", delete this token
private Card hand[1] = new Card(0, 0);  // error: syntax error on token "1", delete this token
private Card hand[2] = new Card(0, 0);  // error: syntax error on token "2", delete this token
private Card hand[3] = new Card(0, 0);  // error: syntax error on token "3", delete this token
private Card hand[4] = new Card(0, 0);  // error: syntax error on token "4", delete this token

class Card {
// Sets the default suit/number to zero.
// Lucky for me, such a 0-0 Card does not exist.
private int number = 0;
private int suit = 0;

// Constructs the Card itself by giving it a number and suit.
// Numbers/suits can *only* be set here.

public Card(int n, int s) {

    // Bound tester for suit/number values.
    // Number has to be between 1 and 14 inclusive (Ace low-Ace high).
    // Suit has to be between 1 and 4 inclusive (H/C/D/S).
    if (n > 0 && n <= 14 && s > 0 && s <= 4) {
        number = n;
        suit = s;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Your statements filling up the hand array are misplaced. Do that in a constructor. – Sotirios Delimanolis Apr 4 '13 at 3:16

The reason for the error is that the line

private Card hand[0] = new Card(0, 0);

looks like a declaration to Java, and you can only declare a simple identifier.

share|improve this answer

You are mixing variable declaration with array initialization, resulting in syntactically incorrect code. You've already declared the array you want to use as storage, to initialize it you can use a block:

private Card[] hand = new Card[5];

{
    hand[0] = new Card(0, 0); 
    hand[1] = new Card(0, 0);
    hand[2] = new Card(0, 0);
    hand[3] = new Card(0, 0);
    hand[4] = new Card(0, 0);
}

You could also declare and initialize the array all on one line:

private Card[] hand = new Card[] {
    new Card(0, 0),
    new Card(0, 0),
    new Card(0, 0),
    new Card(0, 0),
    new Card(0, 0),
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this tutorial covers initialization blocks for those who are interested. – Sotirios Delimanolis Apr 4 '13 at 3:23
1  
+1 Instance initializers FTW – Ray Toal Apr 4 '13 at 3:24

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