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I'm new to Java, and have a question related to the creation of strings.

Case 1:

String a = "hello";
String b = "world";
a = a + b;
System.out.println(a);

Case 2:

String a;
String a = "hello";
a = new String("world");
System.out.println(a);

I would like to know how many objects are created in each case. Because String is immutable so once value is assigned to it that object cannot be reused (that's what I understand currently, please correct me if I'm wrong).

And I would be even more happy if anyone can explain the same with StringBuffer. Thanks.

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A previous post talk of this stackoverflow.com/questions/3297867/… –  AurA Apr 4 '13 at 3:48
    
You can easily get lots of tutorials and articles on this topic that explain each and every thing very nicely and clearly. Don't ask such stupid silly questions for that you can easily get answer by just one hit on google. Do your homework properly and while doing something with honest efforts, if you have some problems you are welcome to put your queries. I don't have enough reputation score to vote down or close this. Don't expect spoon feeding. –  Shailesh Saxena Apr 4 '13 at 4:22
    
This link may help you : javaranch.com/journal/200409/ScjpTipLine-StringsLiterally.html –  Shailesh Saxena Apr 4 '13 at 4:48
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3 Answers

Case 1:

String a = "hello";  --  Creates  new String Object 'hello' and a reference to that obj
String b = "world";  --  Creates  new String Object 'world' and b reference to that obj
a        = a + b;     --  Creates  new String Object 'helloworld' and a reference to   that obj.Object "hello" is eligible for garbage collection at this point

So in total 3 String objects got created.

Case 2:

String a;  -- No string object is created. A String reference is created.
String a = "hello";  -- A String object "hello" is created and a reference to that
a        = new String("world");  -- A String object "world" is created and a reference to that. Object "hello" is eligible for garbage collection at this point


So in total 2 String objects got created
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In case 1, 3 objects are created, "hello", "world" and "helloworld"

In case 2, two objects are created in String pool "hello" and "world" . The world object will be created new even if the "World" object is there in the string pool.

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As you rightly mentioned that strings are immutable, the below creates 3 string literal objects

String a = "hello"; --first
String b = "world"; --second
a = a + b;          --third (the first is now no longer referenced and would be garbage collectioned by JVM)

In the second case, only 2 string objects are created

String a;
String a = "hello";
a = new String("world");

Had you used, StringBuffer instead of String in the first place, like

StringBuffer a = new StringBuffer("hello"); --first
String b = "world";                         --second
a.append(b);                                --append to the a
a.append("something more");                 --re-append to the a (after creating a temporary string)

The above would create only 3 objects as the string is internally concatenated to the same object, while using StringBuffer

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I don't know why you would answer a question like this... but good job. Don't expect the OP to upvote or select this answer. He will read 3 and 2, add them to his homework, and never be heard from again! –  jahroy Apr 4 '13 at 4:05
    
@jahroy hope he does his homework next time :) –  Akash Apr 4 '13 at 4:07
    
You've encouraged him not to... –  jahroy Apr 4 '13 at 4:07
    
@jahroy rightly said, shall make sure of this next time –  Akash Apr 4 '13 at 4:09
    
Akash, as best of my knowledge JVM is not allowed for garbage collection inside the string pool(SCP area). all the Strings are destroyed only when entire JVM is shutdown. Please let me know if I am wrong. –  Shailesh Saxena Apr 4 '13 at 4:18
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