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I have defined below hierarchy of classes, my intention is to design a generic class that allows me to iterate over enum objects (C++11 is not allowed to be used unfortunately). The class definition and test program are:

// base.h

#include <set>

template <typename T>
class Base
{
protected:
   explicit Base(int value);
   typedef typename std::set< Base<T>* > instances;
   static instances s_instances;
   int value_;


public:
   int get_value() const { return value_ ; }
};

template <typename T>
Base<T>::Base(int value): value_(value)
{
   s_instances.insert(this);
}

// derived.h

#include "base.h"

class Derived : public Base<Derived>
{
protected:
    explicit Derived(int value): Base<Derived>(value) { }

public:
    static const Derived value1;
};

// test.cc

#include "derived.h"


template<>
Base<Derived>::instances Base<Derived>::s_instances;

const Derived Derived::value1(1);

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{

   using std::cout;
   using std::endl;

   cout << Derived::value1.get_value() << endl;

}

On compilation using g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.6.3-1ubuntu5) 4.6.3, it gives me below linking error: "

g++ test.cc -o test
/tmp/ccOdkcya.o: In function `Base<Derived>::Base(int)':
test.cc:(.text._ZN4BaseI7DerivedEC2Ei[_ZN4BaseI7DerivedEC5Ei]+0x28): undefined reference to `Base<Derived>::s_instances'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

"

Can anyone please suggest what am I missing in above code?

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Static data members are declared in class definitions and defined outside the class definition. Like this:

// header:
class C {
    static int i;
};

// source:
int C::i = 17;

With a template, you typically don't put any code in source files, so the definition goes in the header:

// header:
template <class T>
class C {
    static int i;
};

template <class T>
int C<T>::i = 17;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Moving the declaration to derived.h such as: template<> typename Base<T>::instances Base<T>::s_instances; works like a charm. –  Ata Apr 4 '13 at 15:27

Be aware that s_instances might not have been initialized before it is used.

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M not sure how that can happen. The static instances of Dervied class are set in test.cc a line below s_instances is initialized. Can you please elaborate. –  Ata Apr 4 '13 at 5:24
    
"template<> Base<Derived>::instances Base<Derived>::s_instances" is not an initialization, it is a definition. –  Yong Lai Apr 5 '13 at 3:24

You can only write

// template<> -> you should not write this in this case.
Base<Derived>::instances Base<Derived>::s_instances;

If you have provided an explicit specialization of Base<Derived>, such as :

class Derived;
template <>
class Base<Derived>
{
protected:
  explicit Base(int value);
  typedef typename std::set< Base<Derived>* > instances;
  static instances s_instances;
  int value_;


public:
  int get_value() const { return value_ ; }
};

Otherwise, you have to stick to writing:

template<typename T>
typename Base<T>::instances Base<T>::s_instances;
share|improve this answer
    
Removing "template<>" gives following compilation error: g++ test.cc -g -o test test.cc:8:26: error: specializing member ‘Base<Derived>::s_instances’ requires ‘template<>’ syntax –  Ata Apr 4 '13 at 15:23
    
Yes - but did you provide a full specialization of Base<Derived> ? second block of code - it's needed for that syntax to be valid. Otherwise, you cannot specialize only that part of your class. –  Nbr44 Apr 5 '13 at 0:16

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