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Can some one please help me identify where i am going wrong? I am trying to use function pointers to a base class function

error C2064: term does not evaluate to a function taking 0 arguments on the line number 30 ie *(app)()

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<stdarg.h>
#include<typeinfo>

using namespace std;

class A{
public:
    int a(){
        printf("A");
        return 0;
    }
};

class B : public A{
public:
    int b(){
        printf("B");
        return 0;
    }
};

class C : public B{
public:
    int(C::*app)();
    int c(){
        app =&C::a;
        printf("%s",typeid(app).name());
        *(app)();
        printf("C");
        return 0;
    }
};
int main(){
    C *obj = new C();
    obj->c();
    getch();
}
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closed as too localized by Jefffrey, Joce, Anthon, Signare, Graviton Apr 6 '13 at 8:55

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2  
Try (this->*app)(); –  WhozCraig Apr 4 '13 at 7:06
1  
Why are you trying to use a pointer to the base class function? Is there any particular reason you can't just call A::a();? –  maditya Apr 4 '13 at 7:08
    
@WhozCraig Thanks a lot!! got it –  Chuntu_Boy Apr 4 '13 at 7:11
    
@maditya just using this program to get some concepts clear –  Chuntu_Boy Apr 4 '13 at 9:56

4 Answers 4

You have to use .* or ->* while invoking pointers to member functions

    class C : public B{
    public:
        int(C::*app)();
        int c(){
            app =&C::a;
            printf("%s",typeid(app).name());
            (this->*app)(); // use ->* operator within ()
            printf("C");
            return 0;
        }
    };
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Pointers to members must always be used in combination with a pointer/reference to object. You probably meant to write this:

(this->*app)();
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Thanks a lot! It works –  Chuntu_Boy Apr 4 '13 at 9:59

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/k8336763.aspx

The binary operator –>* combines its first operand, which must be a pointer to an object of class type, with its second operand, which must be a pointer-to-member type.

So this will solve your problem:

class C : public B {
    public:
        int(C::*app)();

        int c() {
            app = &C::a;
            printf("%s", typeid(app).name());
            (this->*app)();
            printf("C");
            return 0;
        }
};
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Sorry, by the time I had searched & posted answer, other people were already quicker than me. I must know I am in the world of stackoverflow! –  Vishu Apr 4 '13 at 7:24

I have a hunch the problem you're really trying to solve is "How do I call a base class function from the derived class?" If that's the case, the answer is:

int c(){
    app =&C::a;
    printf("%s",typeid(app).name());
    A::a(); //A:: scopes the function that's being called
    printf("C");
    return 0;
}

or

int c(){
    app =&C::a;
    printf("%s",typeid(app).name());
    this->a();
    printf("C");
    return 0;
}
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