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I've been reading the Beautiful Concurrency article about Haskell and STM.

The example given is a bank-account transfer.

Its a noddy bank transfer - its between two numbers sitting in heap memory.

The questions this immediately raises in my head are:

  1. how that transfer atomically hits disk. Until a bank transaction is recorded in a persistent - ACID - manner, it hasn't happened in my book. How do people using languages like Haskell - which won't let you do any IO inside an STM - actually really do atomic changes in data that isn't only in volatile memory?

  2. how to distribute this over many machines; how can you have distributed transactions and a scaling sideways application (without IO inside the STM)?

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As answers imply I think the banking example is supposed to be understood as a metaphor –  jberryman Apr 4 '13 at 21:39
    
@jberryman so what is it useful for then? What would be a more representative problem? Below, we have two answers and the comments of one talk about stm-io-hooks which suggest 1) that stm might work with io, and that 2) this isn't very well known in the haskell community even, or 3) there's a flaw in that that hasn't been exposed here yet... –  Will Apr 5 '13 at 5:55
    
STM is useful when you have concurrency and implementing what you want with locks is non-trivial. I think you might get some really interesting answers if your question were more focused. –  jberryman Apr 5 '13 at 18:09
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2 Answers 2

How do people using languages like Haskell - which won't let you do any IO inside an STM - actually really do atomic changes in data that isn't only in volatile memory?

Via libraries in the IO or similar effect type. E.g. ACID or "MACID" systems.

how to distribute this over many machines; how can you have distributed transactions and a scaling sideways application (without IO inside the STM)?

I don't know of a distributed STM implementation for Haskell, however Cloud Haskell is a distributed programming model for GHC.

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for (1) you mean they don't use STM? Is it classic locking in the IO libraries instead? –  Will Apr 4 '13 at 7:42
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GHC's in-memory STM is used for some disk-based libraries. Sometimes the libraries themselves implement transactional semantics (e.g. databases). hackage.haskell.org/package/stm-io-hooks –  Don Stewart Apr 4 '13 at 7:54
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STM is intended for thread synchronisation and communication, not for persistent storage of data. In other words, STM is designed to let threads share data between themselves without deadlocks or race conditions. Or for threads to send signals to each other. Or basically to coordinate thread activities.

If you want persistent data stored on disk, use a database. MySQL, PostgreSQL, Oracle, etc. There's a million to choose from. This is not the problem that STM is designed to solve.

For distributed processing... we're still working on that. I don't follow these things closely enough to comment on how close this is to being a reality.

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Where does this stand with Don's link to stm-io-hooks? –  Will Apr 5 '13 at 5:52
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