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I have requirement where I want to define a generic class which implements a generic interface.

This is my custom map interface:

public interface ICache<K, T> {
     boolean containsKey(K k);
     T getValue (K key);
     void remove(K key);
     void put(K k, T t);
}

This is the custom class implementation:

 public class CustomCache<K, T> implements ICache<K, T> {

    private org.infinispan.Cache<K, T> cache;

    public CustomCache(org.infinispan.Cache<K, T> cache) {
        this.cache = cache;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean containsKey(K k) {
        return cache.containsKey(k);
    }

    @Override
    public T getValue(K key) {
        return cache.get(key);
    }

    @Override
    public void remove(K key) {
        cache.remove(key);
    }

   @Override
   public void put(K k, T t) {
       cache.put(k, t);
   }
}

But when I try to construct a Cache, I get warnings like "Cache is a raw type. References to generic type Cache should be parameterized"...

A sample method to create a custom map.

public ICache<?, ?> lookupCache(String cacheName) {
    ICache<?, ?> cache = null;
    Cache<?, ?> jCache = new DefaultCacheManager().getCache();
    cache = new CustomCache(jCache);
    return cache;
}

One way to avoid this is simply use, @SuppressWarnings, but can I fix the same using generic.

Using the <> operator though fixes this, but I need to make it 1.6 compatible too.

share|improve this question
    
Note: In Java the convention is to not use the "I"-prefix for interface names. (AFAIK this convention comes from the C-world.) –  Puce Apr 4 '13 at 7:59
    
Am already working on the refactoring part. –  Himanshu Bhardwaj Apr 4 '13 at 8:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The warning pretty much sums it up: your class Cache is a generic type, meaning it takes type parameters, but your reference to the Cache object called jCache doesn't have such type parameters. You should not only supply them in the declaration, but also in the initialization, like so:

cache = new CustomCache<Object, Object>(jCache);

It basically says that you have an object of class CustomCache but you don't know the K nor the T type (yet). All you can say at this point is you'll put only Objects in it.

share|improve this answer
    
So if I use this, then the have a look at the sample method for creating custom map, then the method signature should look like: public ICache<? extends Object, ? extends Object> lookupCache(String cacheName); –  Himanshu Bhardwaj Apr 4 '13 at 7:44
    
The ? wildcard means an unknown type; see the Java tutorial on generics. –  mthmulders Apr 4 '13 at 8:03
    
Yep already aware that's why metioned ? extends Object –  Himanshu Bhardwaj Apr 4 '13 at 8:09
    
If you use ?, you don't have to add extends Object, because any type extends Object, so it doesn't matter you don't know the type, it will always extend Object. –  mthmulders Apr 4 '13 at 8:10
    
Yep makes sense, done!. Thanks for the inputs –  Himanshu Bhardwaj Apr 4 '13 at 8:12

I would implemented it as

public class Cache<K, T> implements ICache<K, T> {
    Map<K, T> map = new HashMap<K, T>();

    @Override
    public boolean containsKey(K k) {
        return map.containsKey(k);
    }

    @Override
    public T getValue(K key) {
        return map.get(key);
    }

    @Override
    public void remove(K key) {
        map.remove(key);
    }

    @Override
    public void put(K k, T t) {
        map.put(k, t);
    }
}

it as Adapter pattern

share|improve this answer
    
If you look at my solution its almost the same, but the difference is here you are defining a new HashMap, which I can't do because, my inner map is being looked from some other source (here JBOSS container). That's why I added a constructor, and that's where the trouble is. :) –  Himanshu Bhardwaj Apr 4 '13 at 7:38

Without trying, I think you can solve situations like this using a generic helper method:

private <K, T> ICache<K, T> createCache)(org.infinispan.Cache<K, T> cache){
  return new CustomCache<K, T>(cache);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Worked like a charm. But would be more interested in understanding why had to resort to a helper method. –  Himanshu Bhardwaj Apr 4 '13 at 9:17
    
generic helper methods can help in some situations to relate generic type parameters (e.g. type parameters of input and output or of 2 input arguments) without knowing their actual type (e.g. "?") –  Puce Apr 4 '13 at 9:53
1  
E.g. in this case you say "whatever the type paramters of the input are, I want the same type paramters for the output", which is different from "?" = "unknown type paramter". –  Puce Apr 4 '13 at 9:58
    
Now that's what got mixed up, I mistook the meaning of ? here. –  Himanshu Bhardwaj Apr 4 '13 at 10:00

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