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This is a question that I got in an interview.

I've two strings defined as

String s1="Java";
String s2="Java";

My question is whether these two references point to the same memory location. In general, when we create identical strings (without new keyword), does the content get stored in the memory only once and all the String objects with the same content just refer to the same location, without storing the string "Java" redundantly ? The hash codes of s1 and s2 are the same. But are hashcodes dependent directly on memory location of the object?

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Don't shoot me I marked this question with tags "C#" and "language-agnostic" since I'd like to know whether there are any differences in other platforms and languages – Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин Apr 4 '13 at 9:37
1  
Such knowledge is what distinguishes an efficient programmer from efficient job-seeker knowing answers to useless questions – Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин Apr 4 '13 at 9:43
    
possible duplicate of How do I compare strings in Java? – Peter O. Apr 4 '13 at 15:47
2  
@GennadyVanin--Novosibirsk wouldn't it be better to create a similar question for other languages. The answers seem to be all for Java at the moment. – Brian Rasmussen Apr 4 '13 at 15:48
    
@BrianRasmussen, thanks, I did. What a waste of time! A couple of more such questions and I dump my project dead-line and will go out studying and answering such questions – Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин Apr 5 '13 at 10:28
up vote 13 down vote accepted

The process of combining identical strings is called "interning", and has been done for many years by lots of language compilers, but not always. The answer to the question, especially as expanded by @GennadyVanin--Novosibirsk, depends on the language and the compiler implementation. For Java, all constant strings are interned, as required by the Java Language Specification. But that's only constant string expressions, and only when they're compiled at the same time. If you have two Java strings sufficiently separated in time and space (e.g., compiled into separate JAR files), they will not be the same object. Similarly, dynamically created Java strings (e.g., the output of various toString() methods) won't be interned unless the method specifically requests it via String.intern(). And yes, all uses of an interned string will share the same memory locations - that's a big part of why strings are interned in the first place.

As to other languages, that's a bigger question, but with all the information in these answers, I'm sure you can research it on the web. Suffice it to say that there is no universal agreement on how this ought to be done.

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Nice one imho, +1 – TheBlastOne Apr 4 '13 at 11:20
    
@Ross Patterson Thank you so much !! This explains the concept well and is the perfect answer to my doubt – Reshma Ratheesh Apr 5 '13 at 7:07
    
@Ross Patterson, Thanks for mention. But my guess it is not by time and space affinity but by the same JVM execution (since JVM can be reinstantiated). – Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин Apr 5 '13 at 10:26

When compiler optimizes your string literals, it sees that both s1 and s2 have same value and thus you need only one string object. It's safe because String is immutable in Java.

String s1="Java";
String s2="Java";
System.out.println(s1== s2);

This gives result true because s1 and s2 points to the same object.

String Pool is the mechanism that all already defined string are stored in some 'pool' and before creating new String object compiler checks if such string is already defined.

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Wrong. You can create String instances with StringBuilder, and if you create a string that´s already used elsewhere as a literal, it won´t !!! be the same string, nor same memory location. That´s why all String comparisons must be done using .equals. String is a reference type. – TheBlastOne Apr 4 '13 at 8:03
    
Only if you have assignments as shown in the question string literals are allocated only once. – TheBlastOne Apr 4 '13 at 8:04
1  
@TheBlastOne I mentioned anything wrong above? – Achintya Jha Apr 4 '13 at 8:09
    
@TheBlastOne You can intern the String manually: String#intern(). – maba Apr 4 '13 at 8:28
    
@maba Yes but if you don´t, string references referencing the "same" string are not equal. – TheBlastOne Apr 4 '13 at 8:52

Example.

First example

String s1 = "FirstString";
String s2 = "FirstString";

 if(s1 == s2) {
   //This condition matched true because java don't make separate object for these two string. Both strings point to same reference.
 }

Second example

String s1= "FirstString";
String s2 = new String("FirstString");

if(s1.equals(s2)) {
  //This condition true because same content.
}

if(s1 == s2) {
  //This condition will be false because in this java allocate separate reference for both of them
}

Conclusion: Java check whether string exist or not. If we create the object of second string using new and have different content then its creates object and assign different reference and In case of If we don't create the object using new and have same content then its assign the same reference as first string contain.

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Java uses a mechanism called StringPool. Meaning that every time a new string is created having a value equal to a string that was already created. Taking your example:

String s1="Java"; String s2="Java";

java will not create a new object equal to the initial one, but the second ones2will just point to the same location in the string pool. The best explanation can be found here.

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String s1="Java";
String s2="Java";
My question is whether these two references point to the same memory location  

Dumb citing §3.10.5 of Java Language Specification:

A string literal is a reference to an instance of class String (§4.3.1, §4.3.3).

Moreover, a string literal always refers to the same instance of class String. This is because string literals - or, more generally, strings that are the values of constant expressions (§15.28) - are "interned" so as to share unique instances, using the method String.intern.

And read the comments to code example there:

This example illustrates six points:

  • Literal strings within the same class (§8) in the same package (§7) represent references to the same String object (§4.3.1).

  • Literal strings within different classes in the same package represent references to the same String object.

  • Literal strings within different classes in different packages likewise represent references to the same String object.

  • Strings computed by constant expressions (§15.28) are computed at compile time and then treated as if they were literals.

  • Strings computed by concatenation at run time are newly created and therefore distinct.

  • The result of explicitly interning a computed string is the same string as any pre-existing literal string with the same contents.

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Adding to others: new keyword always forces to create a new object. If you declare like below:

String s1 = "some";
String s2 = "some";

Then using String Pooling mechanism, both references s1 and s2 will refer to the same String object with the value "some".

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When you have

String str1 = new String("BlaBla");  //In the heap!
String str2 = new String("BlaBla");  //In the heap!

then you're explicitly creating a String object through new operator (and constructor). In this case you'll have each object pointing to a different storage location.

But if you have:

String str1 = "BlaBla";        
String str2 = "BlaBla";

then you've implicit construction. Two strings literals share the same storage if they have the same values, this is because Java conserves the storage of the same strings! (Strings that have the same value)

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String s1="Java";
String s2="Java";

both points to same object. for more detail click here

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Even if they are in multiple (parallel, simultaneous) different programs, processes? – Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин Apr 5 '13 at 5:01
    
yes. if they are in multiple (parallel, simultaneous) different programs, process will share the same string for the same JVM not for different JVM. – AmitG Apr 5 '13 at 6:57
String s1="Java";
String s2="Java"; 

Do they point to the same memory location?

I originally said "no" but in the case above, see the StringPool answer referred to below, it's actually yes..

"when we create identical strings (without new keyword), does the content get stored in the memory only once and all the String objects with the same content just refer to the same location"

...kind of see detailed answer in question "Java Strings and StringPool"

"The hash codes of s1 and s2 are the same. But are hashcodes dependent directly on memory location of the object?"

No the hashcodes depend on the content of the String

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Your "No" seems to contradicts §3.10.5 from Java Language Specification: "A string literal is a reference to an instance of class String (§4.3.1, §4.3.3). Moreover, a string literal always refers to the same instance of class String. This is because string literals - or, more generally, strings that are the values of constant expressions (§15.28) - are "interned" so as to share unique instances, using the method String.intern." Check also examples there – Gennady Vanin Геннадий Ванин Apr 5 '13 at 5:00
    
I agree, I had it wrong about the "memory location". The linked answer about StringPool was news to me! – Vorsprung Apr 5 '13 at 8:02
    
first answer is YES. Both s1 and s2 reference variable are pointing to the same string object place in the string pool. – AmitG Apr 5 '13 at 8:07
    
@AmitG I agree, answer amended – Vorsprung Apr 5 '13 at 8:26

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