Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to start on a new project to help enrich my asp.net knowledge, since I'm not completely satisfied with what my class is teaching me. From my (very little) experience with Rails, I recall every application containing its own development web server. Say I were trying to create a local-only application, but I want it to run in a web browser (Therefore ASP.Net). Are there any options in terms of being able to distribute an application and have it launch its own, or just not require IIS/VS/Apache-mono?

share|improve this question
    
I'm sorry, I didn't really make it clear. I'm aware of the VStudio development server, and of full blown server options. I'm asking if there's anything light and distributable. Ie, someone can download this, potentially somewhat large, package which contains my app and also a lightweight, only-needs-to-serve-one-person server to run it. I'm not entirely sure how ASP.Net works, since everything I've learned in class has been inside Visual Studio. (Not very satisfying, to be honest... I prefer the openness of Rails, but, hey. I'm in the class, I'd better learn the technology.) –  Sanarothe Oct 16 '09 at 21:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You may want to look into aspNETserve. It sounds like it would fit your needs. I haven't worked on it recently, so it probably has some rough edges.

On the plus side its all open source, and if you are just getting started with ASP.NET it would be a real eye opener on how the internals of the ASP.NET lifecycle operate.

share|improve this answer

The simple answer is that you need a web server to run the application. It cannot run without one.

If we're talking demo purposes or you don't require that many features of a web server there are redistributable web-servers that you can include with your setup package. Like Alex mentioned the most popular one seems to be Cassini.

share|improve this answer

I'm assuming that you want to run the site on the same machine you are developing it on.

Visual Studio 2005 and up allows you to run the site from VS itself if you want to view it locally on your development machine.

To my understanding Visual Web Developer allows you to do the same as well. Visual Web Developer

share|improve this answer

You can use the cassini web server. Please note that those are different redistributable:

http://www.asp.net/Downloads/archived/cassini/

http://ultidev.com/products/Cassini/

share|improve this answer

I'm not really certain why you would want to develop a web application (with all the difficulties it entails, due to the fact that you are dealing with a stateless connection to an unknown client machine), but then run the entire thing on the client machine.

Surely it makes more sense to develop a WinForms application?

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that it's not effecient. But it's an exercise in ASP.Net rather than an exercise in c# + learning winforms, which I also know nothing of. Lastly, since the demo project that I've devised is to supplement Diablo 2 trading, I want it to be in the browser, right next to my forum tabs. Lastly, there is the slightest possibility that someone else might want to use this, and if I do complete it I'm surely going to post it, thus the research on standalone embedded servers, rather than just using the VS server. Chose aspnetserve because it's open source and supports 3.5 :) –  Sanarothe Oct 16 '09 at 22:10

Follow this guide to setup IIS on your PC to run ASP.NET apps:

http://www.geekpedia.com/tutorial25%5FSetting-up-your-ASPNET-server-IIS.html

share|improve this answer
    
If you have the Home edition of either XP, Vista, or Win 7, you will not be able to install IIS on your machine though. –  John Lechowicz Oct 16 '09 at 21:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.