Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say my program such was thus:

my_string = "I think we should implement <random_plan> instead of <random_plan>"


 def generate_random_plan

   #Some code that returns a string that is not the same every time the method is called, involving randomness.

 end

puts my_string.gsub("<random_plan>", generate_random_plan)

So as I have written it, it would print something like "I think we should implement plan H instead of plan H". When what I really want is for gsub to call the method each time it performs a substitution, so I can end up with "I think we should implement plan D instead of plan Q". I have a sneaking suspicious the gsub method just isn't built for that and it can't be done, so could you suggest the easiest way to make this happen?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One basic principle in Ruby is "when in doubt, try a code block." In fact, gsub() accepts a code block in place of a string for its second parameter.

Here's an example that is something like what you're looking for:

'axbxcxdxe'.gsub( 'x' ) { rand(9) }

Try that code in irb and you'll get random digits for the x's:

a0b6c0d3e

The replacement code block is a powerful feature, especially because it receives the original matched string as a parameter. As a contrived example, suppose you wanted to convert only the vowels in a string to uppercase:

def vowelup( s )
    s.gsub( /[aeiouy]/ ) { |c| c.upcase }
end

print vowelup( 'Stack Overflow' )

This prints:

StAck OvErflOw

JavaScript has essentially the same feature too:

function vowelup( s ) {
    return s.replace( /[aeiouy]/g, function( c ) {
        return c.toUpperCase();
    });
}

console.log( vowelup('Stack Overflow') );
share|improve this answer
    
why rand(9)? not 2,3 etc. –  Arup Rakshit Apr 4 '13 at 8:42
    
It's just an example showing how gsub calls a block and you can call a function such as rand() in that block. The actual numbers aren't significant. Of course the actual code would have something to do with the random responses the OP wants. –  Michael Geary Apr 4 '13 at 8:46
    
what's the diff between 'axbxcxdxe'.gsub( 'x' ) and 'axbxcxdxe'.gsub( 'x' ) { rand(9) } ? –  Arup Rakshit Apr 4 '13 at 8:48
    
Try those both in irb and see what it says. The first one just returns an Enumerator. –  Michael Geary Apr 4 '13 at 8:50
    
Excellent, I am new to Ruby, so a code block wasn't even on my radar, but that is perfect. Thanks. –  Tristan Apr 4 '13 at 18:34

gsub accepts a block and, if given, calls it on each match. Return your random value from it.

my_string = "I think we should implement <random_plan> instead of <random_plan>"

def generate_random_plan s
  plans = ('A'..'Z').to_a
  s.gsub('<random_plan>') do
    plans.sample # random plan
  end
end

generate_random_plan my_string # => "I think we should implement A instead of J"
generate_random_plan my_string # => "I think we should implement Q instead of A"
generate_random_plan my_string # => "I think we should implement Z instead of H"
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.