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I have a list as below:

list = [ [1,2,3,4,5], 
         [1,2,3,3,5], 
         [1,2,3,2,5], 
         [1,2,3,4,6] ]

I would like to parse through this list and remove the entry if it satisfy below conditions:

  1. if list[i][0] is the same as list[i+1][0] AND
  2. if list[i][4] is the same as list[i+1][4]

which will result in below list:

list = [ [1,2,3,4,5],
         [1,2,3,4,6]]

Any help is much appreciated. Thanks.

Edit: Using Python 2.5.4

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2  
Just a remark: from your description I would have removed entries 0 and 1 (because of indexation of your conditions). –  Howard Apr 4 '13 at 8:46
    
@Howard You are right. It could be the deletion of entry 0 and 1 too. Depending on how the solution is implemented. In any case, both are ok. –  flan forever Apr 4 '13 at 8:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use a list comprehension to keep everything not matching the condition:

[sublist for i, sublist in enumerate(yourlist)
    if i + 1 == len(yourlist) or (sublist[0], sublist[4]) != (yourlist[i+1][0], yourlist[i + 1][4])]

So, any row that is either the last one, or one where the first and last element do not match the same columns in the next row is allowed.

Result:

>>> [sublist for i, sublist in enumerate(yourlist)
...     if i + 1 == len(yourlist) or (sublist[0], sublist[4]) != (yourlist[i+1][0], yourlist[i + 1][4])]
[[1, 2, 3, 2, 5], [1, 2, 3, 4, 6]]
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This works like a charm. Thanks. –  flan forever Apr 5 '13 at 1:14

Less concise non-list comprehension version.

list = [ [1,2,3,4,5], 
         [1,2,3,3,5], 
         [1,2,3,2,5], 
         [1,2,3,4,6] ]

output = []

for i, v in enumerate(list):
    if i +1 < len(list):
        if not (list[i][0] == list[i+1][0] and list[i][4] == list[i+1][4]):
            output.append(v)
    else:
        output.append(v)

print output
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I like how this is done. Easy to understand. Thanks. –  flan forever Apr 5 '13 at 1:15

Just to put some itertools on the table :-)

from itertools import izip_longest

l = [ [1,2,3,4,5], 
      [1,2,3,3,5], 
      [1,2,3,2,5], 
      [1,2,3,4,6] ]

def foo(items):
    for c, n in izip_longest(items, items[1:]):
        if not n or c[0] != n[0] or c[4] != n[4]:
            yield c

print list(foo(l))

Output:

[[1, 2, 3, 2, 5], [1, 2, 3, 4, 6]]

If you don't mind that this don't work in place put rather creates a new list.

Edit:

Since you told us you are using 2.5.4, you can use a method like the following instead of izip_longest:

# warning! items must not be empty :-)
def zip_longest(items):
    g = iter(items)
    next(g)
    for item in items:
        yield item, next(g, None)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't mind creating a new list. But i'm currently using 2.6, so no izip_longest. –  flan forever Apr 4 '13 at 9:04
    
izip_longest is avaiable in 2.6 –  sloth Apr 4 '13 at 9:05
    
sorry my bad, i'm using 2.5.4 :| ImportError: cannot import name izip_longest –  flan forever Apr 4 '13 at 9:31
    
Well, I edited my answer to include a replacement for izip_longest, but note that you could also use a list comprehension as shown in Martijn's answer if you don't want to add two new functions to your code :-) –  sloth Apr 4 '13 at 9:40
    
Thanks for your work :) –  flan forever Apr 5 '13 at 1:12

I think list comprehension is best for this code.

res = [value for index, value in enumerate(a) if not (index < len(a)-1 and value[0]==a[index+1][0] and value[4]==a[index+1][4])]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Will study more on list comprehension. :) –  flan forever Apr 5 '13 at 1:15

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