Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The desired output of this programme is:

Ping Pong Ping Pong Ping Pong

Yet it alternates between that and

Pong Ping etc.

The thing is, I create the Ping thread and run it first. So I am not sure why Pong is occassionally coming first.

So here is my code (readily compilable). It works, essentially. I just don't understand why it sometimes prints "Pong" first. Could someone please shed some light as to why this is happening?

// Printer class - will be the object that both threads lock / synchronize onto
class Printer
{
    int numberOfMessages;
    int messageCount;

    // Constructor allowing user to choose how many messages are displayed
    Printer(int numberOfMessages)
    {       
        this.numberOfMessages = numberOfMessages;
        this.messageCount = 0;
    }

    // If more messages are to be printed, print and increment messageCount
    void printMsg(String msg)
    {
        if (messageCount < numberOfMessages)
        {
            System.out.println("[" + msg + "]");            
            ++messageCount;
        }
        else
        {
            System.exit(0);
        }
    }
}

// PingPong thread
class PingPongThread extends Thread
{
    Printer printer;
    String message; 

    public PingPongThread(Printer printer, String message)
    {
        this.printer = printer;
        this.message = message;
        this.start();
    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        while(true)
        {
            synchronized (printer)
            {                   
                // Print message whether it is Ping or Pong
                printer.printMsg(message);

                // Notify
                printer.notify();

                // Wait
                try
                {
                    printer.wait();
                } 
                catch (InterruptedException e)
                {               
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }
    }


}

// Two threads communicate with eachother to alteratively print out "Ping" and "Pong"
public class PingPong
{
    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        Printer printer = new Printer(6);

        PingPongThread pingThread = new PingPongThread(printer, "Ping");
        PingPongThread pongThread = new PingPongThread(printer, "Pong");
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
Why would it not happen? –  Martin James Apr 4 '13 at 9:19
    
I didn't formulate the question properly. I create Ping thread first and class start() in the Ping constructor. The run method includes print "Ping" statement. As this is done first, I can't see why Pong is sometimes printed first. –  mgibson Apr 4 '13 at 9:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This

    Printer printer = new Printer(6);
    PingPongThread pingThread = new PingPongThread(printer, "Ping");
    synchronized (printer) {
        printer.wait();
    }
    PingPongThread pongThread = new PingPongThread(printer, "Pong");

will guarantee that pingThread always starts first.

Nevertheless the threads coordination still depends on who runs faster. Consider this

final Object obj = new Object();
Thread t1 = new Thread() {
    public void run() {
        synchronized (obj) {
            obj.notify();
        }
    };
};

Thread t2 = new Thread() {
    public void run() {
        synchronized (obj) {
            try {
                obj.wait();
            } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    };
};

t1.start();
t2.start();

if t1 notifies before t2 goes waiting the test hangs.

share|improve this answer
    
Just what I was looking for thanks! –  mgibson Apr 4 '13 at 10:27
    
imagine thread1 calls printer.notify(); thread2 gets notification and comes to print.notify() before thread2 calls printer.wait(); See my point? My test shows what happens - notification is lost. –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Apr 4 '13 at 10:47

You want to force threads run order. The JVM does not guarantee that, so you have to roll your own. I can think of two solutions.

Ugly hack, but may work: Yield the current thread after starting the first thread but before starting the second one, to "encourage" it to run. E.g:

PingPongThread pingThread = new PingPongThread(printer, "Ping");
Thread.yield();
PingPongThread pongThread = new PingPongThread(printer, "Pong");

This is the simplest solution but it is not guaranteed to work every time, e.g., if another thread (say, an event handler) will grab the control after the yield.

A more robust approach: Have the main thread wait for some other signal before starting the second thread. Suppose this signal is passed through a field named lock, this will look something like:

Object lock = new Object();
PingPongThread pingThread = new PingPongThread(lock, printer, "Ping");
lock.wait();
PingPongThread pongThread = new PingPongThread(lock, printer, "Pong");

and the thread run() method will be something like

synchronize (lock) { lock.notify(); }
while (true) {
  // As before...
}
share|improve this answer

If you create two threads, e.g. t1 and t2, and then invoke:

t1.start();
t2.start();

it does not mean that t1 will start executing before t2. It might, but there is a chance t2 will start first. You'll have to write your own approach that gurantees t1 starts first. For example, after starting the first thread, wait() on an object, and in the first thread notify() on that object at the beginning of run()

share|improve this answer

Because run method runs in a different thread, and you cannot assume which one will run first unless you have proper synchronisation. If thread started first it doesn't mean that it will be more important. All animals are equal.

You should create a special flag in the thread which is notified when a thread starts. And wait for the flag before starting the second thread. Simple way to do it is to use Condition.

share|improve this answer

JVM does not provide any guarantee that threads will start in the order they are started. That is why sometimes 2nd thread starts first.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, i mistakenly corrected your answer, please check i rolled it back right.. –  Evgeniy Dorofeev Apr 4 '13 at 10:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.