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So I'm tasked with creating a maze solver with a Queue, a Set, a Location object, and Cell objects which culminate into a Maze object.

To give a quick look at what essentially all my code will do when I'm complete:

7
10
   _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
|_ _ _  |  _ _   _  |
|  _ _| | |  _  |   |
| |   | |_| | | |_| |
|_ _|_ _   _| |_  | |
|  _    | |  _ _| |_|
| |_ _|  _|   |_    |
|_ _ _ _|_ _|_ _ _| |

Into this:

 @ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
|@ @ @ @|  _ _   _  |
|  _ _|@| |@ @ @|   |
| |   |@|_|@| |@|_| |
|_ _|_ @ @ @| |@ @| |
|  _    | |  _ _|@|_|
| |_ _|  _|   |_ @ @|
|_ _ _ _|_ _|_ _ _|@|
                   @

Everything I've done is pretty good so far, yet when I get to the actual coding the findPath() method in my Maze object my code generates a path that is not valid. When I take in a file to read the maze I convert that maze into a multi-dimensional character array, I then convert that character array into an multi-dimension array of Cells and map each cell's boundaries north, south, east, and west with boolean values.

Now it comes to actually figuring out how to navigate through the maze, which I have attempted in the Maze's findPath() method but actually kind of failed.

 @  @  @  @  .  .  .  .  .  . 
 .  .  .  @  .  .  .  .  .  . 
 .  @  @  @  .  .  .  .  .  . 
 .  @  @  @  @  .  .  .  .  . 
 .  .  @  @  @  .  .  .  .  . 
 .  @  @  @  @  .  .  .  .  . 
 .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 

First, to illustrate what I'm supposed to achieve let me give you a peek at my requirements document:

The algorithm operates according to the following pseudo-code:

* Visit the starting Location.
* Add this Location to the set.
* Enqueue the Location in the queue.

while (ArrayQueue<E> != empty( )) 
{
    Dequeue a Location(next) from the queue

        For each neighbor of Location(next) which has
         not yet been placed in the set, repeat:
                * Visit the neighbor of Location(next).
                * Add the neighbor of Location(next) to the Set.
                * Enqueue the neighbor of Location(next)in the Queue.
 }

I'm almost positive that I've used his algorithm somewhat correctly but I cannot figure out what I have done wrong to get the path I've come across. My biggest headache is with the Maze object's findPath() method which I have included below. I guess my biggest question is what am I doing wrong? I've been at this for days and just can't figure this out. Any help is appreciated. My code is below:

My Maze's findpath method

public void findPath()
{
    Location startLocation = new Location(0, 0);
    theMaze[startLocation.getRow()][startLocation.getColumn()].setVisited(true);

    Location endLocation = new Location(6, 9);

    Location cursor;

    locationQueue.enqueue(startLocation);
    locationSet.enter(startLocation);

    while(!locationQueue.isEmpty())
    {
        cursor = locationQueue.dequeue();

        if(cursor == endLocation)
            break;

        for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
        {
            Location temp = cursor.getLoc(i);

            if(theMaze[cursor.getRow()][cursor.getColumn()].validDirection(i) && (!locationSet.isElement(temp)) && !(theMaze[temp.getRow()][temp.getColumn()].isVisited()))
            {
                cursor = cursor.getLoc(i);
                theMaze[cursor.getRow()][cursor.getColumn()].setVisited(true);

                if(theMaze[cursor.getColumn()][cursor.getColumn()].getPathAmount() < 2)
                {
                    cursor = startLocation;
                    continue;
                }

                locationSet.enter(cursor);
                locationQueue.enqueue(cursor);                          
            }               
        }           
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < locationSet.size(); i++)
    {
        System.out.println("Row " + locationSet.get(i).getRow() + " Column " + locationSet.get(i).getColumn());
        theMaze[locationSet.get(i).getRow()][locationSet.get(i).getColumn()].setPath();
    }

    for(int i = 0; i < theMaze.length; i++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < theMaze[i].length; j++)
        {
            System.out.print(theMaze[i][j].toString());
        }
        System.out.print("\n");
    }

}

Edit: My problem is with the Maze object and not the other classes so I'm essentially cleaning up.

share|improve this question
    
I would start by adding some debugging code to your findPath function. Have your function print out what its doing at critical points and what it "thinks", in words, so that you can spot the error. –  Blender Apr 4 '13 at 9:22
    
I have and for sake of getting rid of junk I took it out of this code. I just don't understand where I'm going wrong. I have a feeling I'm misreading the algorithm, but I don't know how. –  CuttingWristsFromCode Apr 4 '13 at 9:24
    
Are you reading in and storing your maze correctly? –  Blender Apr 4 '13 at 9:25
    
Yup, sure am. Double checked it like crazy. The conversion from file to char[][] to Cell[][] occurs in the methods in the Maze object. –  CuttingWristsFromCode Apr 4 '13 at 9:28
    
What kind of edit was just made to this question? Seems like it obsoletes all discussion, answers, comments, etc... I'm going to rollback the edit, since it makes all the answers and comments a mystery. –  jahroy Apr 16 '13 at 21:08

1 Answer 1

Your basic algorithm is flawed. You only add cells to the path, but do not delete them if they turn out to be dead ends.

This kind of problem is best suited for recursive algorithms.

function findExit(gameMap, listOfVisitedCells, currentCell, solution)
    listOfVisitedCells.add(currentCell);
    for each gameMap.NeighbourOf(currentCell)
        if neighbour not in listOfVisitedCells
             solution.add(neighbour)
             if (gameMap.isExit(neighbour)) {
               return true;
             }
             if (findExit(gameMap, listOfVisitedCells, currentCell, solution)) {
               return true;
             }
             solution.remove(neighbour);
        }
    }
    // No neighbours of the current cell got to find the exit.
    return false;
 }

Of course, this will explore the map depth-first so if several paths are valid, you are not guaranteed to find the shortest one (use Djikstra's algorithm for that).

UPDATE: From reviewing your code:

It is difficult to mentally debug so many lines of code, and SO is no sustitute for spending a fair time with your debugger of choice, watching the actual state of the program vs the expected state, and so on. Don't expect much of it, SO is better suited for concrete questions ("I expect this piece of code to do this but it does not, why") with limited amount of code.

Anyway this strikes me as odd:

        Location temp = cursor.getLoc(i);

        if(theMaze[cursor.getRow()][cursor.getColumn()].validDirection(i) && (!locationSet.isElement(temp)) && !(theMaze[temp.getRow()][temp.getColumn()].isVisited()))
        {
            cursor = cursor.getLoc(i);       <-- Why are you overwritting the current
                                             <-- location when you have still not checked
                                             <-- all the posible directions?
            theMaze[cursor.getRow()][cursor.getColumn()].setVisited(true);

            if(theMaze[cursor.getColumn()][cursor.getColumn()].getPathAmount() < 2)
            {
                cursor = startLocation;
                continue;
            }

            locationSet.enter(cursor);
            locationQueue.enqueue(cursor);                          
        }               

I would bet that this is not correct. Of course, there maybe another problems hidden, it is better (and gives you more experience) if you try debugging it by yourself to find the fragment that does not work as expected (and then, if needed, ask for help in SO).

share|improve this answer
    
To be more precise, your algorithm (implementation mistakes apart) would tell you if there is a path through the maze, but not which one it is. –  SJuan76 Apr 4 '13 at 9:38
    
At that is almost what I need, and I can add the breadcrumb bits later. I just can't spot my mistake. –  CuttingWristsFromCode Apr 4 '13 at 11:50

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