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I have the following classes (very simplified version):

public interface A { }
public abstract class A<TType, TContentType> : A where TType: A
{
    public abstract void Initialise();
    public abstract TType DeepCopy();
    public TContentType Value { get; private set; }
}

public class B : A<B, double>
{
    public override void Initialise() { this.Value = 3.0; }

    public override B DeepCopy() { return new B(); }
}

public class C : A<C, char>
{
    public override void Initialise() { this.Value = 'v'; }

    public override C DeepCopy() { return new C(); }
}

I can create a list of A types, like so:

public static List<A> CreateList()
{
    List<A> myList = new List<A>();
    myList.Add(new B());
    myList.Add(new C());
    return myList;
}

I would like to create a method that, given a single object of type A, will create a list of these objects based on a specified length.

For example:

public static List<A> CreateList(A baseA, int length)
{
    List<A> myList = new List<A>();
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
       // create a deep copy of baseA
       // call the Initialise method on the new object
       // add to the list
    }
    return myList;
}

I'm unsure of how I could create the deep copy without knowing the type of A, because A does not contain anything .. do I need to create a generic method for this ?

Any pointers are greatly appreciated

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're complicating things quite a bit, firstly you shouldn't need to specify the type of the object that the generic parameters belong to as a generic parameter (TType) as we already have that information.

Here is a solution. It has an interface IA that has a IA Clone() method on it. We can then call that method and safety cast it to T in CreateList(). CreateList needs to have a generic argument of the type that you want as the generic parameters of A/B/C could be anything.

public static List<T> CreateList<T>(T baseA, int length) where T : IA
{
    var myList = new List<T>();
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        myList.Add((T)baseA.Clone());
    }
    return myList;
}

public interface IA
{
    public abstract IA Clone();
}

public abstract class A<TContentType> : IA
{
    public abstract void Initialise();
    public TContentType Value { get; private set; }
}

public class B : A<double>
{
    public override IA Clone()
    {
        var b = new B();
        // transfer properties
        return b;
    }

    //public override void Initialise() { this.Value = 3.0; }
}

public class C : A<char>
{

    public override IA Clone()
    {
        var c = new C();
        // transfer properties
        return c;
    }

    //public override void Initialise() { this.Value = 'v'; }
}
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Just suggesting how to make your approach to work: if your parameter's type is going to be A, then apperently A interface has to have DeepCopy() and Initialise() methods. Also to let you have DeepCopy() method that returns specific typed object, you might use explicit interface implementation

public interface A
{
    void Initialise();
    A DeepCopy();
}

public abstract class A<TType, TContentType> : A where TType : A
{
    public abstract void Initialise();
    public abstract TType DeepCopy();
    A A.DeepCopy() { return this.DeepCopy(); }
    public TContentType Value { get; protected set; }
}

public class B : A<B, double>
{
    public override void Initialise() { this.Value = 3.0; }
    public override B DeepCopy() { return new B(); }
}

public class C : A<C, char>
{
    public override void Initialise() { this.Value = 'v'; }
    public override C DeepCopy() { return new C(); }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<A> listBC = CreateList();
        List<A> list = CreateList(new B(), 3);
    }

    public static List<A> CreateList()
    {
        List<A> myList = new List<A>();
        myList.Add(new B());
        myList.Add(new C());
        return myList;
    }

    public static List<A> CreateList(A baseA, int length)
    {
        List<A> myList = new List<A>(length);

        for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        {
            A copy = baseA.DeepCopy();
            copy.Initialise();
            myList.Add(copy);
        }

        return myList;
    }
}

I don't know your real code, but DeepCopy() { return new B(); } must copy some member values right? And also when populating a list with copies - do you really need to Initalise them or leave deep copies as is?

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Yes I will be copying member values, this was just a simplified version. Thanks for the suggestions. –  Sherlock Apr 4 '13 at 12:50

There is no built-in way to create a correct deep copy. Types, that needs to be deep-copied, should implement IClonable.

You can inherit your A interface from it, and then call Clone() in CreateList, casting it return value to needed type.

public interface A: IClonable { 
    Initialize();
}


public static List<A> CreateList(A baseA, int length)
{
    List<A> myList = new List<A>();
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
       var copy = (A) baseA.Clone();
       copy.initialize();
       myList.Add(copy);
    }
    return myList;
}

The downside is that Clone returns object, and not your inherited type. But that is a widely-used approach in the framework itself.

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