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I'm trying to instantiate a TreeMap using a Comparator which should be able to access the said TreeMap, i.e. the one it will be used for (I guess that "will" must precisly be the problem...):

final Map<String, Integer> map = new TreeMap<String, Integer>(new Comparator<String>() {

    @Override
    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
        Integer i = map.get(o1);
        // Error: "the local variable map may not have been initialized"
        return ...;
    }

});

I can get why this error occurs, since when instantiating the Comparator<String>, the map variable isn't initialized yet, but is there any workaround solution?

A solution would have been a setComparator method in the TreeMap implementation, but its comparator field has been declared as final:

final Map<String, Integer> map = new TreeMap<String, Integer>();
Comparator<String> comparator = new Comparator<String>() {

    @Override
    public int compare(String o1, String o2) {
        Integer i = map.get(o1);
        return ...;
    }

};
// map.setComparator(comparator);
share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to sort on the values? –  assylias Apr 4 '13 at 9:32
1  
As per my understanding a comparator should only use the values that are supplied as parameters in compare method. If you use other values you would end up tying it to the state of outside values and then the comparator would not be consistent. This also explains why the comparator is final. If you want 2 different comparators you are better off creating 2 tree map instances. –  prashant Apr 4 '13 at 9:35
    
Would Map<Integer, String> be out of the question? –  Lone nebula Apr 4 '13 at 9:41
    
Well, if you can't assign the Comparator to the TreeMap, why not do it the other way around? You couldn't go with an anonymous class any longer, but what's the catch? –  skirsch Apr 4 '13 at 11:30
1  
This still won't possibly work. A TreeMap will just blow up and become completely unusable if you try to compare keys with the value in the map itself. You can't do this. –  Louis Wasserman Apr 4 '13 at 16:18

2 Answers 2

Can't you implement Comparator on your class and pass this to the TreeMap constructor, example:

class MyClass implements Comparator<MyClass> {
private String property;
@Override // java.util.Comparator.compare
public int compare(MyClass o1,
            MyClass o2) {
return o1.getProperty().compare(o2.getProperty());
}
@Override // java.util.Comparator.equals
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    return this.getProperty().equals(o.getProperty());
}

public String getProperty() {
    return this.property;
}

public void setProperty(String myPropertyValue) {
    property = myPropertyValue;
}

TreeMap <String, MyClass> myMap = null;

public MyClass() {
  myMap = new TreeMap<String, MyClass>(this);
}

If you need further assistance, do leave a comment with more information as to your specific case.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Two months later, after having relooked into the answer @hd1 gave me (which doesn't work as is actually), here is a possible solution:

public class SortedByValueMap<K, V extends Comparable<V>> implements Comparator<K> {

    private final Map<K, V> map = new TreeMap<K, V>();

    private class CustomTreeMap<KK extends K, VV extends V> extends TreeMap<KK, VV> {

        private static final long serialVersionUID = 9196929305071517886L;

        private CustomTreeMap(Comparator<KK> c) {
            super(c);
        }

        @Override
        public VV put(KK key, VV value) {
            map.put(key, value);
            return super.put(key, value);
        };

        @Override
        public VV remove(Object key) {
            map.remove(key);
            return super.remove(key);
        }

    }

    @Override
    public int compare(K o1, K o2) {
        return map.get(o1).compareTo(map.get(o2));
    }

    public Map<K, V> getMap() {
        return new CustomTreeMap<K, V>(this);
    }

}

Then:

Map<String, Integer> map = new SortedByValueMap<String, Integer>().getMap();
map.put("r", 2);
map.put("b", 0);
map.put("a", 1);
System.out.println(map); // prints {b=0, a=1, r=2}

But anyway, it has to be considered as a technical challenge solution rather than a real efficient tool though (since two identical parallel maps are created), so use it sparingly... ;)

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