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I have a class with a method template:

struct Subject
{
  template <typename T>
  void doSomething()
  {
    ..
  }
};

Now whenever doSomething is called (with any T) I would like to have an "Observer" be notified:

  template <typename T>
  void onDoSomething()
  {
    ..
  }

It's important that the observer is a method template (class template with contained method would work as well). If it wasn't, I could just implement the common observer pattern.

It would be ok to modify Subject::doSomething()so that it calls a method. However, the class Subject should not "know" the concrete Observer / observer method.

The idea behind this is: I use Subject in two projects. I need (and have) the observer only in one of them.

Is there any way to achieve this?

share|improve this question
    
I forgot to mention that I can't use C++11 features. But even if I could, I don't see how this solves my specific question? – Philipp Apr 4 '13 at 10:08
    
@Philipp you are right, it doesn't help. I misunderstood your question. – juanchopanza Apr 4 '13 at 10:20

Tough one. It seems to boil down to

Notification must be resolvable at compile time (it's a template)

and, at the same time,

The notification should not be resolvable at compile time (Subject shouldn't know the observer)

I can think of two ways to do it:


1. Add an overload of doSomething:

template <typename T, typename Observer>
void doSomething()
{
  doSomething<T>();
  Observer::onDoSomething<T>();
}

Then call the one-parameter version in project A, and the two-parameter version in project B.


2. Have the file defining Subject include a header which will be different/differently-configured in each project:

Subject.h

#include "observer_def.hpp"

struct Subject
{
  template <typename T>
  void doSomething()
  {
    ..
    notifyDoSomething<T>();
  }
};

observer_def.hpp in project A:

template <typename>
inline void notifyDoSomething() {}

observer_def.hpp in project B:

template <typename T>
inline void notifyDoSomething()
{
  MyObserver::onDoSomething<T>();
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your ideas. Method 1 is not desirable because doSomething is called deeply within some other methods which I don't want to change. Method 2 didn't look like modern C++ style to me. I guess the solution I found (see other answer) is more what I needed, but +1 anyways. – Philipp Apr 4 '13 at 11:08
    
@Philipp: actually, your solution requires exactly the same preprocessor machinery that Angew used... though I would recommend using a #ifdef ... #else ... #endif block rather than two different files (it's less confusing). – Matthieu M. Apr 4 '13 at 11:41
    
@MatthieuM. That's why I said "different/differently-configured." I was trying to cover the #ifdef option as well. – Angew Apr 4 '13 at 11:44

I finally found a satisfying solution by means of template specialization:

///signaling struct. Could be replaced with any other type.
struct SpecializedObserver{};

///unspecialized:
template <typename>
struct Observer
{
    template <typename T>
    static void onDoSomething()
    {
        //default: do nothing.
    }
};

///optional. Specialize in project A or leave aside in project B:
template<>
struct Observer<SpecializedObserver>
{
    template <typename T>
    static void onDoSomething()
    {
        std::cout << "doing something with " << typeid(T).name() << std::endl; 
    }
};

struct Subject
{
    template <typename T>
    void doSomething()
    {
      Observer<SpecializedObserver>::onDoSomething<T>();
      ..
    }
};

This solution doesn't require any action if I don't want an Observer. In case I want to have one, I specialize the Observer template as shown above.

EDIT: This worked fine in my test, however the question is how I can use this in a scenario with different compilation units - where should I define the specialization?

share|improve this answer
1  
The specialization should be visible at the point of use. It therefore should be included before Subject::doSomething is defined... which requires preprocessor hackery (#ifdef...) and therefore one wonders why use a template specialization and not just a different definition of a non-template Observer class. – Matthieu M. Apr 4 '13 at 11:39

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