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Hello I'm new to pl sql and am trying to make a query like this:

SELECT column1, sum (column2)
FROM table1
WHERE sum (column2) <> 0
GROUP BY column1

Basically what I would like to do is to select only those rows where the sum(column2) grouped by column1 is <> 0.

This query gives me an ORA-00934 error which makes sense because in the WHERE clause it is not specified that the sum operation must be grouped by column1 (or at least I think this is the problem).

I tried different solutions like:

SELECT CASE WHEN SUM(column2) <> 0 then (SUM(column2), column1) END 
...

but pl-sql does not like it.

What works would be:

SELECT column1, case when SUM(column2) <> 0 then SUM(column2) END
...

But in this case I don't have exactly what I want since the result is a pseudotable like the one from SELECT column1, SUM(column2)... except for the fact that I see white fields where the SUM(column2) = 0 while I don't want to see the whole row.

Can anybody help me?

Thank You

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You just need to put your WHERE clause into HAVING clause.

SELECT column1, sum (column2)
FROM table1
GROUP BY column1
HAVING sum (column2) <> 0

The HAVING clause gets evaluated after GROUP BY has been applied.

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Right! It was easy! as I said, I'm new to sql... thank you much! –  user2211236 Apr 4 '13 at 10:00
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Use the HAVING clause:

SELECT column1, sum (column2)
FROM table1
GROUP BY column1
HAVING sum (column2) <> 0

The Oracle PL/SQL HAVING clause is used to filter or restrict the groups formed by the GROUP_BY clause.

Source

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that easy?! thank you a lot! as I said I'm new to sql and didn't know about the having clause. –  user2211236 Apr 4 '13 at 10:00
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