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This is driving me crazy. My .NET application calls a stored proc to retreive a stored hashed password from a database:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[sGetHashedPW] 
    -- Add the parameters for the stored procedure here
    @UserName varchar(32) = N''
AS
DECLARE @ContextInfo varbinary(128)
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    --Set Context Info for this session to Username requested
    SELECT @ContextInfo = CAST(@Username AS varbinary(128));
    SET CONTEXT_INFO @ContextInfo;

    --Return Hashed User Password to Application
    SELECT TOP 1 [Password] as PWHash FROM [dbo].[vSecurity] WHERE [UserName] = @UserName;
END

The application verifies the password and runs a second stored procedure which creates a row in a session table, returns a string (GUID) to the application, and sets CONTEXT_INFO to the value of the string.

Now anytime the application opens a connection, it calls sSessionStart and passes the string it received during login. If the connection opens in a new session, the proc SHOULD set CONTEXT_INFO to the verified string value it was passed:

ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[sStartSession] 
    @token varchar(128)=NULL
AS
DECLARE @GUID uniqueidentifier
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    IF @token IS NULL --Token not passed from the application
        BEGIN
        BEGIN TRANSACTION;
        BEGIN TRY
            SELECT @GUID = personnel_token 
                FROM t300_Personnel INNER JOIN vSecurity ON t300_Personnel.personnel_user_name = vSecurity.UserName 
                WHERE personnel_user_name = CAST(CONTEXT_INFO() as varchar(128));
            SET @GUID = ISNULL(@GUID,NewID());
            INSERT INTO dbo.t900_UserSession
            (session_token,session_dbuser,session_id)
            OUTPUT CAST(@GUID as varchar(128))
            SELECT @GUID, [DB_User], @@SPID
                FROM t300_Personnel INNER JOIN
                     vSecurity ON t300_Personnel.personnel_user_name = vSecurity.UserName
                WHERE [UserName] = CAST(CONTEXT_INFO() as varchar(128));

            UPDATE dbo.t300_Personnel SET [personnel_token]= @GUID 
                WHERE [personnel_user_name] = CAST(CONTEXT_INFO() as varchar(128));

            --Change Context Info to the GUID
            SET CONTEXT_INFO @GUID;
        END TRY

        BEGIN CATCH
            IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
                ROLLBACK TRANSACTION;
            THROW 51000, N'Session could not be opened',1;
        END CATCH

        IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
            COMMIT TRANSACTION;
        END

    ELSE --Token was passed from the application
        BEGIN
        BEGIN TRY
            SELECT @GUID = CAST(@token as uniqueidentifier);
            INSERT INTO dbo.t900_UserSession
            (session_token,session_dbuser,session_id)
            SELECT @GUID, DB_User, @@SPID
                FROM t300_Personnel INNER JOIN
                     vSecurity ON t300_Personnel.personnel_user_name = vSecurity.UserName
                WHERE personnel_token = @GUID;

            IF (@@ROWCOUNT = 0) --Insert failed due to invalid token
                SELECT CAST('INVALID TOKEN' as varchar(128));
            ELSE --New session was created
                BEGIN
                    SET CONTEXT_INFO @GUID;
                    SELECT CAST(@GUID as varchar(128));
                END
        END TRY
        BEGIN CATCH
            IF (ERROR_NUMBER() = 2627) --Token is valid but session already exists
                SELECT CAST(@GUID as varchar(128));
            ELSE
                THROW;
        END CATCH
        END
END

When I simulate this in SSMS query sessions it all works fine. The application is having trouble with it.

The first part works fine:

Public Sub Authenticate(username As String, password As String, connString As String)
    Using oConn As New SqlConnection(connString)
        'Check that connection exists and is open
        oConn.Open()
        If oConn.State = ConnectionState.Open Then
            Dim sqlCmd As New SqlCommand("EXEC dbo.sGetHashedPW N'" & username & "'", oConn)
            _pwhash = sqlCmd.ExecuteScalar
            _authenticated = EncryptHash.VerifyHash(password, "SHA512", _pwhash)
            If _authenticated Then
                _username = username
                _connString = oConn.ConnectionString
                sqlCmd.CommandText = "EXEC dbo.sStartSession"
                _hashToken = sqlCmd.ExecuteScalar
            Else
                clearVariables()
            End If
        End If

    End Using
End Sub

Everything works great at this point, CONTEXT_INFO is set correctly in both procedures. The connection is closed now, but the application has the validation string returned from the sStartSession procedure.

When a form is opened, a SqlConnection is created and opened. The form runs sStartSession, passing the string parameter:

Private Sub frmPersonnel_Load(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles MyBase.Load
    Me.MdiParent = frmMain

    'Open the form's connection and ensure the database session is logged
    oCN = New SqlConnection(currentUser.ConnectionString)
    oCN.Open()
    Dim sqlCmd As New SqlCommand("EXEC dbo.sStartSession '" & currentUser.Token & "'", oCN)
    Dim sResult = sqlCmd.ExecuteScalar

Here's the funny thing... sResult returns the string as expected, but immediately the CONTEXT_INFO is set to 0x00000:

SELECT 
   [session_id], [context_info], 
   CAST([context_info] as uniqueidentifier) as Context,
   CAST([context_info] as varchar(128)) as Context2,
   [program_name] 
FROM 
   sys.dm_exec_sessions 
WHERE 
   [program_name] = 'this application'

ARGHHHH!

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use SELECT CONTEXT_INFO() like msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180125.aspx –  ta.speot.is Apr 4 '13 at 11:01
    
CONTEXT_INFO() is session-specific, so I cant see what the context info of the application's session is doing from SSMS using CONTEXT_INFO() –  KacireeSoftware Apr 4 '13 at 11:28
    
I would change the vb code so it uses parameters to prevent SQL Injection. See gist.github.com/FilipDeVos/5344709 And properly wrap the commands in "using" statements. –  Filip De Vos Apr 9 '13 at 10:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The short answer is ownership chaining. Testing the Stored Procs, I was logged into SSMS as SA. I emulated the login under a SSMS Session, and everything worked fine. Logging in using the application, which has a very limited security profile, is where the problem occured. It ended up that the app was missing EXECUTE privilege on one funciton :(

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