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My DB has about 150K DocumentNames records and all I am doing is a simple join with NameTypes. NameTypeID is a foreign key in DocumentNames.

This is my query:

With cte as 
(
    Select ROW_NUMBER() OVER 
    (Order By nm.Name asc ) 
    peta_rn,    
    dn.DocumentNameID,
    dn.DocumentID  
    From DocumentNames dn

    Left Join NameTypes nm On dn.NameTypeID = nm.NameTypeID
) 
Select * from cte Where peta_rn >= 10000 And peta_rn <= 10050

This is the screenshot:

enter image description here

The sort takes 90% cost. I am totally confused what should I do at this point. I want to bang my head but I can't as there are other people around. Please suggest what should I do?

share|improve this question
    
If you arrange your NameTypes in alphabetical order you wouldn't need the join. You could just order by NameTypeID. –  Jodrell Apr 4 '13 at 11:10
3  
Is the left join necessary? Can it be changed to an inner join? If so, you might create an indexed view on both tables and sacrifice some speed for insert/update/deletes to selects. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Apr 4 '13 at 11:11
1  
Implementing what @Filip De Vos suggested would be my first choice then but it has its risk (falling out of sync). Another option might be to create a clustered indexed view on those records that do have a name (hello inner join) and union those results with the ones that don't have a name. That way, the row_number on the indexed view can use, well, an index <g>. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Apr 4 '13 at 12:35
2  
The index on nm.Name isn't as useful as it might be, because of the outer join. Name may be NULL in the output of the CTE. And this also means ROW_NUMBER() isn't going to be consistent from one run to the next, because the records that don't match NameTypes will come in random order. (For that matter, without a secondary sort column, the records that do match will also come in random order, within blocks!) So, I suggest that something is amiss with the whole point of ROW_NUMBER()—maybe it would be better to step back and ask yourself (and us) what this query is trying to accomplish. –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 4 '13 at 12:56
1  
Why do you need to get records "lying between 10000 and 10050" when they are going to be inconsistent between query runs due to the reasons @AndrewLazarus stated? Are you trying to do paging in the web page's data grid, and you forgot to mention that? –  HardCode Apr 4 '13 at 14:08
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For what it worth, here is some SQLFiddle to test any syntax.

By far the simplest approach is to enusre that the NameTypes are inserted in Name order, and therefore, that the NameTypeIDs are assigned alphabetically.

In this situation there is no need to join to the NameTypes table. You can just do,

WITH [CTE] AS
(
SELECT
            ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY [NameTypeID] ASC) [PetaRN],    
            [DocumentNameID],
            [DocumentID]
    FROM
            [DocumentNames]
) 
SELECT
            [PetaRN],
            [DocumentNameID],
            [DocumentID]
    FROM
            [CTE]
    WHERE
            [PetaRN] BETWEEN 10000 AND 10050
    ORDER BY
            [PetaRN] ASC;

How about

WITH [CTE] AS
(
SELECT
            ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY [NameTypeID] ASC) [PetaRN],    
            [DocumentNameID],
            [DocumentID]
    FROM
            [DocumentNames]
) 
SELECT TOP 50
            [PetaRN],
            [DocumentNameID],
            [DocumentID]
    FROM
            [CTE]
    WHERE
            [PetaRN] >= 10000
    ORDER BY
            [PetaRN] ASC;

When testing large datasets on SQL 2005 I've noticed that CTE's don't perform well for large result sets, this may be related to resource availability on the server. A counter intuitive use of temporary tables may turn out to be faster. This also allows you to index the row number allowing quick page selection however, this must be offset against the cost of insertion. Try it and see.

CREATE TABLE #Peta
(
    [PetaRN] BigInt NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [PK_Peta] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
    [DocumentNameID] Int NOT NULL,
    [DocumentID] Int NOT NULL
);

INSERT #Peta
SELECT
            ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY [NameTypeID] ASC) [PetaRN],    
            [DocumentNameID],
            [DocumentID]
    FROM
            [DocumentNames];

SELECT TOP 50
            [PetaRN],
            [DocumentNameID],
            [DocumentID]
    FROM
            #Peta
    WHERE
            [PetaRN] >= 10000
    ORDER BY
            [PetaRN] ASC;


DROP TABLE #Peta;
share|improve this answer
    
I would love to do that however that still doesn't solve the problem. It still takes 50 seconds with clustered index on NameTypeID –  Jack Apr 4 '13 at 12:48
    
@Jack, are most of NameTypeID's NULL? –  Jodrell Apr 4 '13 at 13:28
add comment

If, for some arbitrary reason (like a job interview), you need to optimize a query like this, try a UNION.

[Corrected to recognize alias column]

With cte as 
(
  Select ROW_NUMBER() OVER 
  (Order By nm.Name asc ) AS
  peta_rn,    
  dn.DocumentNameID,
  dn.DocumentID  
  From DocumentNames dn

  INNER Join NameTypes nm On dn.NameTypeID = nm.NameTypeID /* note change */
),  
cte2 as 
(
  Select ROW_NUMBER() OVER 
  () AS /* yes, this is random */
  peta_rn,    
  dn.DocumentNameID,
  dn.DocumentID  
  From DocumentNames dn

  WHERE dn.NameTypeID  NOT IN SELECT (nm.NameTypeID FROM NameTypes nm)
) 

Select * from cte Where peta_rn >= 10000 And peta_rn <= 10050

UNION

Select * from cte2 Where peta_rn >= 10000 And peta_rn <= 10050

I've never done a UNION with CTEs, so you may need some extra parentheses to make this legal. Also an ORDER BY for the entire result. I'll leave that as an exercise.

The point is that the INNER JOIN will be able to use the index on nm.Name, while the second clause will be able to do an indexed anti-semijoin. Two indexed queries should be much faster than one unindexed query.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice. You've implemented and mentioned the same solutions/problems I did in comments. +1 if you can solve the between 10000 and 10050 problem. As is, this will return 100 records. 50 random NULL values and 50 names. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Apr 4 '13 at 14:31
    
@LievenKeersmaekers, sorry, I skipped over your comment, which I have now upvoted. Which table is peta_rn in? (Although, as you can see from the comment flame war, there is something brain-damaged about the entire setup, which is what happens when you beat your head against a wall.) Perhaps you can just move the WHERE into the CTEs. Why the filter is after the CTE is unclear to me, because the entire operation is unclear. –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 4 '13 at 14:38
    
@LievenKeersmaekers: I also see on your profile reference to the exact issue we have here: The XY Problem! meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem/… –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 4 '13 at 14:40
    
OP is trying to page through the results but as you (and I) already said, the current solution is flawed and so will be other solutions. +1 on effort though. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Apr 4 '13 at 17:29
    
@LievenKeersmaekers. Thank you, just 23,000 more and I will catch up to you. For re-sorting an existing page without regard to the global sort, wouldn't it just be best to do it client-side in the UI widget? Skip the trip to the DB completely? –  Andrew Lazarus Apr 4 '13 at 22:25
show 3 more comments

A few things you could try:

  1. Make the clustered index start with Name... not very efficient to have a wide clustered index but give it a go and see if it stops the sort occuring

  2. Permanently create a column which has the order number in it. This depends on how often your table is updated.

Please post your table and index definitions.

share|improve this answer
    
ClusteredIndex is on DocumentNameID for DocumentNames and NameTypeID on NameTypes. –  Jack Apr 4 '13 at 11:52
    
So maybe try creating a clustered index on nm.Name instead and see if it removes your sort.... it might have other bad consequences but you have to start somewhere. –  ElectricLlama Apr 4 '13 at 12:03
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