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For my tile game Im making I choose to use a 4D nested list system.

  • First dimension - layer (background and foreground but there might be others)
  • Second and third dimension - a 2D grid, a classic for tile based games
  • Fourth dimension - the objects that a tile in a grid contains (for example multiple items can drop on the same floor tile in a rougelike

I have an exact number of layers and the height and width of the map. What is a good way to initialize the first three dimensions with these numbers and then fill every "tile", that is the fourth dimension, with empty object lists?

Here is some code to illustrate it better:

List<List<List<List<GameObject>>>> Grid;
public readonly int Layers, Height, Width;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If three of the dimensions have a fixed length, you could use an array instead:

List<GameObject>[,,] Grid = new List<GameObject>[Layers, Width, Height];
for(var l = 0; l < Layers; l++)
    for(var x = 0; x < Width; x++)
        for(var y = 0; y < Height; y++)
{
    Grid[l, x, y] = new List<GameObject>();
}

If you really need Lists (looks a lot worse IMO):

List<List<List<List<GameObject>>>> Grid = new List<List<List<List<GameObject>>>>();
for(var l = 0; l < Layers; l++)
{
    Grid.Add(new List<List<List<GameObject>>>());
    for(var x = 0; x < Width; x++)
    {
        Grid[l].Add(new List<List<GameObject>>());
        for(var y = 0; y < Height; y++)
        {
            Grid[l][x].Add(new List<GameObject>());
        }
    }
}
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Thanks! I somehow thought that arrays were not an option. This works and looks great. –  user2244484 Apr 4 '13 at 11:25
1  
Although csharpler answer is correct, I'm not quite sure why OP wants to do it this way instead of creating specific objects with well-defined properties. Something like a Layer class which has an Array of Tile objects (initialized by the Layer constructor itself, based on Width and Height) with X and Y properties and a List of GameObject. Seems more readable imo. –  Conrad Clark Apr 4 '13 at 11:28
1  
I thought about breaking it down into classes but there is no big need. Those classes (at least in the simple game that I'm making) would have only one purpose - encapsulating a list. This works just fine. –  user2244484 Apr 4 '13 at 12:10

You can do this using linq:

List<List<List<List<GameObject>>>> Grid;
Grid = Enumerable.Range(0, Layers).Select(l =>
       Enumerable.Range(0, Height).Select(h =>
       Enumerable.Range(0, Width).Select(w => 
           new List<GameObject>()).ToList()).ToList()).ToList();

The same code can be used to produce an array of arrays (or whatever combination is more flexible for your needs), i.e:

List<GameObject>[][][] Grid;
Grid = Enumerable.Range(0, Layers).Select(l =>
       Enumerable.Range(0, Height).Select(h =>
       Enumerable.Range(0, Width).Select(w => 
           new List<GameObject>()).ToArray()).ToArray()).ToArray();
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Oh wow! Thats really sexy! Can this be done with multidimensional arrays and not jagged ones? –  user2244484 Apr 10 '13 at 20:40
    
Not cleanly - you'd have to pre-define the multidimensional array, then use similar code in a foreach to set each item - nested for loops would be the best way to go... –  Simon MᶜKenzie Apr 10 '13 at 22:17

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