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I'm hoping to take a dataset with cross section salary data for employees and create a large uninterrupted time series, imputing values along the way. Suppose I have:

name <- c("carl","carl","bob","rick","rick","rick","rick")
sex <- c(rep("M",7))
salary <- c(18000, 14000, 34000, 11000, 23000, 23000, 25000)
date <- as.Date(c("2007-04-30","2007-07-30","2009-12-09","2006-01-01",
                 "2008-01-01","2009-12-09", "2010-01-01"))

salaries <- data.frame(name,sex,salary,date)
salaries
  name sex salary       date
  carl   M  18000 2007-04-30
  carl   M  14000 2007-07-30
   bob   M  34000 2009-12-09
  rick   M  11000 2006-01-01
  rick   M  23000 2008-01-01
  rick   M  23000 2009-12-09
  rick   M  25000 2010-01-01

As we can see, poor carl got his salary cut by 4k in July. Prior to that, he was earning 18k. This was the case for 3 months before he got the cut ,but my data doesn't reflect this. I'd like to make a nice picture showing this trend, but first I need to change the data to look like this (where * denotes imputed values):

head(salaries)
  name sex salary       date change
  carl   M  18000 2007-04-30    0
  carl   M  18000 2007-05-30*   0 
  carl   M  18000 2007-06-30*   0 
  carl   M  14000 2007-07-30    1
   bob   M  34000 2009-12-09    0 
  rick   M  11000 2006-01-01    0
  rick   M  11000 2006-02-01*   0
  ...   .. ....... ...... ....
  rick   M  11000 2007-12-01*   0
  rick   M  23000 2008-01-01    1
  rick   M  23000 2008-02-01*   1
  ....   ...... ...... ........
  rick   M  23000 2009-12-09    1     
  rick   M  25000 2010-01-01    2 

So i'd like to impute in-between values and also mark when a change occurs. A guy like bob, who never had a salary change, just stays at 0. But rick, who's had multiple salary changes get's marked each time so we know when the change occurred and which number it is. I'm only interested in the month as the unit of analysis but it would be useful to know how to impute daily as well.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have a single time series, you can use na.locf to replace missing values with the last available value or approx if you only want to interpolate between values. To create those individual time series, you can convert the data between your "tall" (normalized) format and a "wide" format with dcast and melt. To count the number of changes, you can use ddply and cumsum.

library(reshape2)
library(plyr)
library(zoo)

# Convert to wide format
d <- dcast( salaries, date ~ name, value.var = "salary" )

# Add all the dates you want
dates <- seq.Date( from = min(d$date), max(d$date), by="month" )
d <- merge( d, data.frame(date=dates), all=TRUE )

# Fill in the missing values
# If you want the last non-missing value:
#d <- as.data.frame(lapply(d, na.locf, na.rm=FALSE))
# If you only want to interpolate between values:
d <- as.data.frame(lapply(d, 
  function(x) approx( seq_along(x), x, seq_along(x), method="constant" )$y
))

# Convert back to the tall format
d <- melt(d, id.vars="date", value.name="salary", variable.name="name", na.rm=TRUE)

# Add the number of changes
d <- ddply(
  d, "name", transform, 
  change = cumsum(c(0, diff(salary) != 0))
)
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The count works but the monthly fake data imputations aren't going through. And for some reason, there is an extra value for bob. –  kpeyton Apr 4 '13 at 13:55
    
I have updated my answer to interpolate only between values, and to ensure there is (at least) one observation per month. –  Vincent Zoonekynd Apr 4 '13 at 14:19
    
thanks, is it possible to restrict the interpolation to just one value per month? And to keep the other covariates (e.g. sex) –  kpeyton Apr 4 '13 at 23:41
    
You could restrict the data to one observation per month, e.g., by joining (with merge or sqldf) with the vector of desired dates -- but what would happen with employees with a single observation, not in that list of dates? They would either be discarded, or the observation would be kept, but not aligned with the rest (which seemed to be your initial purpose). If the other variables do not change with time, you can extract their values with unique(salaries[,c("name","sex")]) and join that with the result. –  Vincent Zoonekynd Apr 5 '13 at 6:42
    
I see, thanks for the response. And what if I have additional time varying covariates , can I add these in the step for converting back to the tall format as well (the melt command)? –  kpeyton Apr 5 '13 at 7:09

Elaborating on @Vincent's advice:

        name <- c("carl","carl","bob","rick","rick","rick","rick")
        sex <- c(rep("M",7))
        salary <- c(18000, 14000, 34000, 11000, 23000, 23000, 25000)
        office <- c('melbourne','sydney','adelaide','perth','perth','melbourne','melbourne')
        date <- as.Date(c("2007-04-30","2007-07-30","2009-12-09","2006-01-01",
                          "2008-01-01","2009-12-09", "2010-01-01"))

        salaries <- data.frame(name,sex,salary,date, office)
        salaries


        library(reshape2)
        library(plyr)
        library(zoo)

Dealing with numeric vector using approx

        # Convert to wide format
        d <- dcast( salaries, date ~ name, value.var = "salary" )

        # Add all the dates you want
        dates <- seq.Date( from = min(d$date), max(d$date), by="month" )
        d <- merge( d, data.frame(date=dates), all=TRUE )

        # Fill in the missing values
        # If you want the last non-missing value:
        #d <- as.data.frame(lapply(d, na.locf, na.rm=FALSE, fromLast = T))
        #If you only want to interpolate between values:
        d <- as.data.frame(lapply(d, 
                                  function(x) approx( seq_along(x), x, seq_along(x), method="constant" )$y
        ))

        # Convert back to the tall format
        d <- melt(d, id.vars="date", value.name="salary", variable.name="name", na.rm=TRUE)

        # Add the number of changes
        d <- ddply(
          d, "name", transform, 
          change = cumsum(c(0, diff(salary) != 0))
        )

Convert character vector with na.locf

        # Convert to wide format
        a <- dcast( salaries, date ~ name, value.var = "office" )

        # Add all the dates you want
        dates <- seq.Date( from = min(a$date), max(a$date), by="month" )
        a <- merge( a, data.frame(date=dates), all=TRUE )

        # Fill in the missing values using na.locf
        a <- as.data.frame(lapply(a, na.locf, na.rm=FALSE, fromLast = T))

        # Convert back to the tall format
        a <- melt(a, id.vars="date", value.name="office", variable.name="name", na.rm=TRUE)

Merge results

        d$date <- as.Date(d$date)
        out = merge(a,d, by = c('name','date'))
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