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I've narrowed this down as far as I can, it seems like a bug...

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  // Crashes
  std::vector<uint8_t> bs{1, 0, 0};
  std::search_n(bs.begin(), bs.end(), 3, 1);

  // Does not crash
  std::vector<uint8_t> bs{1, 0};
  std::search_n(bs.begin(), bs.end(), 2, 1);

  return 0;
}

I get

Segmentation fault: 11

I hope I'm not using std::search_n incorrectly :)

Stepping through the STL implementation doesn't seem possible at present, using LLDB.

version info:

$clang --version
Apple LLVM version 4.2 (clang-425.0.24) (based on LLVM 3.2svn)
Target: x86_64-apple-darwin12.3.0
Thread model: posix

Evidence ;)

13:06:47 ~/bug$ cat bug.cc
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  std::vector<uint8_t> bs{1, 0, 0};
  std::search_n(bs.begin(), bs.end(), 3, 1);

  // std::vector<uint8_t> bs{1, 0};
  // std::search_n(bs.begin(), bs.end(), 2, 1);

  return 0;
}
13:06:52 ~/bug$ clang++ -std=c++11 -stdlib=libc++ bug.cc -o bug
13:07:36 ~/bug$ ./bug
Segmentation fault: 11
13:07:42 ~/bug$
share|improve this question
    
Doesn't crash with clang 3.2: http://liveworkspace.org/code/tRPXH$2 –  interjay Apr 4 '13 at 11:53
    
Works fine with the GNU libstdc++, and there's nothing fishy about your use of find_n (except that you're not using the return value and that with these inputs the search will always fail). –  Michael Wild Apr 4 '13 at 11:54
    
@interjay but is liveworkspace using libc++ or libstdc++? –  Michael Wild Apr 4 '13 at 11:56
    
It's very likely that you simplified your code too much. Does your program still crash in this minimal example? –  Zeta Apr 4 '13 at 12:00
1  
@0A0D It does work: ideone.com/ScxCGv. You missed the compiler flag. –  dpj Apr 4 '13 at 12:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It seems to be a bug in search_n, it crashes for me too (Xcode 4.6.1). I think in __search_n the test

if (__first == __s)  // return __last if no element matches __value_

needs to be

if (__first >= __s)  // return __last if no element matches __value_

What happens is that the algorithm starts matching, then mismatches and starts over; this new startpoint is beyond __s which is the logical last possible starting point for the length of the pattern. The old test only tested for equality, not "beyondness". With the fix it doesn't crash for me any more.

share|improve this answer
    
I suppose this should be filed, do you have an account to do this? llvm.org/bugs/enter_bug.cgi –  dpj Apr 4 '13 at 13:20
    
No, I don't. (adding chars to meet 15 chars requirement) –  Dix Apr 4 '13 at 13:25
    
created an account, filed a bug: llvm.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=15667 –  Dix Apr 4 '13 at 14:19
    
Thanks. Confirmed bug. Working on fix... –  Howard Hinnant Apr 4 '13 at 15:03
1  
Agreed that this is the right fix. Thanks for both the bug report and the fix. Committed revision 178764. –  Howard Hinnant Apr 4 '13 at 15:44

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