Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
bool stop = false;
           int f1 = 1;
           int f2 = 2;
           int f3 = 0;
           int sum = 2;
           while (!stop)
           {
               f3 = f1 + f2;
               sum += f3 % 2 == 0 ? f3 : 0; //THIS ONE
               stop = f3 > 4000000 ? true : false;//AND THIS ONE.
               f1 = f2;
               f2 = f3;
           }

What is that conditional operator? This is the first time I've seen anything like this.

share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

The line:

sum += f3 % 2 == 0 ? f3 : 0; //THIS ONE

is the same as:

if (f3 % 2 == 0)
  sum += f3;
else
  sum += 0;

which could of course be rewritten as

if (f3 % 2 == 0) sum += f3;

and the line

stop = f3 > 4000000 ? true : false;//AND THIS ONE.

is the same as

if (f3 > 4000000)
   stop = true;
else 
   stop = false;

Or better yet:

stop = f3 > 4000000;
share|improve this answer
    
good answer; clear, concise, and unambiguous. – kloucks Oct 17 '09 at 1:17
    
if (f3 % 2 == 0) sum += f3; could also be rewritten as merely if (!(f3 % 2)) sum += f3; since 0 is a false value and non-zero is a true value. – Amber Oct 17 '09 at 1:50
    
@klouks: tyvm! @Dav: you are correct, but I have never been a fan of mixing boolean operations and integers. This is however purely a question of taste, and usually has to do with how much contact one has with old-school C programmers. :-) – cdiggins Oct 17 '09 at 14:06
1  
Neither of you are correct. There's no conversion between int and bool in C#. You're thinking of C, not C#. – Eric Lippert Oct 17 '09 at 16:14
    
Thanks for correcting me Eric. I never do that, so I didn't know it wasn't even legal in C#. – cdiggins Oct 17 '09 at 19:20

The expression

x = c ? a : b;

is equivalent to

if (c)
    x = a;
else
    x = b;

Also, the statement

stop = f3 > 4000000 ? true : false;

is completely redundant, and can be simplified to

stop = (f3 > 4000000);

(Paretheses added for clarity.)

share|improve this answer
    
Which could open up a way for an optimization/simplification on do { ... } while (f3 <= 4000000); – Tordek Oct 17 '09 at 0:49

It's called the ternary operator.

share|improve this answer

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty67wk28%28VS.80%29.aspx

it basically reads like this:

if this condition is true ? then do this : otherwise do this

share|improve this answer

If the condition (stuff to the left of ? is true, then it uses the first (the one before :) if not it uses the second (stuff after :).

int res = someCondition ? valueIfTrue : valueIfFalse;

see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty67wk28%28VS.80%29.aspx

Another one u will probably see soon:

   SomeClass res = someVariable ?? valueIfSomeVariableIsNull;


Update: on the refactor route, you might want:

while (!isMoreThan4Million)
{
   f3 = f1 + f2;
   bool sumIsEven = f3 % 2 == 0;
   sum += sumIsEven ? f3 : 0;
   isMoreThan4Million = f3 > 4000000;
   f1 = f2;
   f2 = f3;
}
share|improve this answer

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ty67wk28%28VS.80%29.aspx

It's called the ternary operator. It will evaluate the value before the : if the expression on the left of the ? is true - otherwise it evaluates the value after the :

share|improve this answer

it's more or less a compact equivalent of an if then:

(condition) ? ifConditionIsTrueUseThisValue : ifConditionIsFalseUseThisValue ;

commonly used to do a conditional value assignment:

variableName = (condition) ? valueIfConditionIsTrue : valueIfConditionIsFalse ;

simple stupid example to assign a value of x which ignores values below zero:

x = (x < 0) ? 0 : x ;
share|improve this answer

As masterfully written as the original was, you could obfuscate it's intent further:

int sum = 2;
for(int f1 = 1, f2 = 2, f3 = 0; !((f3 = (f1 + f2)) > 4000000); f1 = f2, f2 = f3)
	sum += f3 * (~f3 & 1);

... or ... write it like a normal person would:

int f1 = 1;
int f2 = 2;
int f3 = 0;
int sum = 2;

while( f3 <= 4000000 )
{
    f3 = f1 + f2;
    bool even = (f3 & 1) == 0;
    if( even )
        sum += f3;
    f1 = f2;
    f2 = f3;
}

... or ... if you like it really simple:

int sum = 4613732;

Even after rewriting it twice I don't get what it does... what's the purpose of this anyway?

share|improve this answer

predicate ? then : else

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.