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Wondering if I could get a little guidance here. On DbContext's MSDN page (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.data.entity.dbcontext%28v=vs.103%29.aspx), it states: "Represents a combination of the Unit-Of-Work and Repository patterns and enables you to query a database and group together changes that will then be written back to the store as a unit."

My understanding of the repository pattern is it provides an abstraction over your data persistence layer. How can a concrete implementation of something coupled to EF be considered an abstraction?

Also, how would I leverage it as a Unit of Work pattern? Currently, my Unit of Work has an ObjectContext property, and one properties for each of my repos:

public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork
{
    private TPSEntities _context = new TPSEntities();
    private ICustomerRepository _customerRepository;
    private IUsersRepository _UsersRepository;

    public ICustomerRepository CustomerRepository
    {
        get
        {
            if (_customerRepository == null)
            {
                _customerRepository = new CustomerRepository(_context);
            }
            return _customerRepository;
        }
    }

    public IUsersRepository UsersRepository
    {
        get
        {
            if (_UsersRepository == null)
            {
                _UsersRepository = new UsersRepository(_context);
            }
            return _UsersRepository;
        }
    }


    public void Save()
    {
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Save(string storedProcedure)
    {
        _context.SaveChanges();
        //_context.ExecuteStoreCommand
    }

    private bool disposed = false;

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                _context.Dispose();
            }
        }
        this.disposed = true;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

I then inject my Unit of Work object into my controller via DI, and away I go.

Is there a better way to do this with DbContext?

Thanks,

Chris

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ObjectContext or DbContext wouldn't make any logical difference. – Gert Arnold Apr 4 '13 at 12:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually, DbContext is an abstraction over the database - there are several flavors of the SQL engines from Microsoft that all work out-of-the-box with EF, and if you use EF in your code the only thing you have to change to switch between the engines is the connectionstring.

That said, it is not unusual to want yet another abstraction, this time over the ORM tool - EF, in your case. Most guides, blog posts etc I find that demonstrate the repository pattern, do this by abstracting the ORM tool as well. So do you, in the code you provide.

I guess it boils down to your definition of "database layer" and "repository" - and even though I'm sure there are stringent definitions in the literature, the definitions are not consistent across the internet. (Surprised? :P)

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