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I want to write template variant of memcpy:

template< typename T > 
inline T& MemCopy( T& dest, const T& src )
{
  *( T* )memcpy( &dest, &src, sizeof( src ) ) ;
}

When I try to compile in VS2010 the next code :

typedef short AMSync[ 4 ] ;
static AMPSync aSync ;

void Init( const AMPSync& sync )
{
   MemCopy( aSync, sync ) ;
}

I get error:

'T &MemCopy(T &,const T &)' : template parameter 'T' is ambiguous
          : see declaration of 'MemCopy'
          could be 'const short [4]'
          or       'AMPSync'

If I use:

template< typename T1, typename T2 > 
inline T1& MemCopy( T1& dest, const T2& src )
{
   *( T1* )memcpy( &dest, &src, sizeof( src ) ) ;
}

then errors are absent, but in this case compiler cannot check sizes of arguments

Is there way to achieve both purposes.

share|improve this question
    
You can add a static-assert to the second variant. –  n.m. Apr 4 '13 at 12:13
2  
I spent a few minutes wondering about this, then realised you probably just have a typo. AMPSync != AMSync. This compiles. –  BoBTFish Apr 4 '13 at 12:46
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1 Answer 1

template<typename T1, typename T2> 
T1& MemCopy(T1& dest, const T2& src)
{
   static_assert(sizeof(src) == sizeof(dest));
   return *reinterpret_cast<T1*>(memcpy(&dest, &src, sizeof(src)));
}

or

template<typename T1, typename T2> 
typename std::enable_if<sizeof(T1) == sizeof(T2), T1&>::type MemCopy(T1& dest, const T2& src)
{
   return *reinterpret_cast<T1*>(memcpy(&dest, &src, sizeof(src)));
}

Though why do you want to do this? Your example would be better with:

static AMPSync aSync ;

void Init( const AMPSync& sync )
{
    aSync = sync;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank all of you for answers. But I see that I was not exact. I would want that types of parameters differ only by const modifier. as regading variant with assigment. It will generate compiler error if asignment operator (=) is protected for some class. Of course, if it is done then simple copying is not recomeneded but in some cases it can be needed. –  user1807338 Apr 6 '13 at 12:07
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