Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm implementing an iterator to a particular class, and the iterator needs access to A members, as well as A needs access to iterator -- I want to be able to declare A::iterator it;

I know I may simply nest a class inside the other, in this case, I would have:

class A {
public:
    class iterator {
    };
};

But both class A and iterator itself have a great load of code, and I would like to split these classes into two different files.

The problem here is that class A would naturally #include iterator.hpp, but iterator also needs to include A, in order to implement the proper iterator operators. And this is where I'm stuck at: even adding include guards I didn't manage to get this working.


Here's a snippet of what I have:

a.hpp:

# include iterator.hpp
# ifndef A_HPP
# define A_HPP

template <typename T>
class A {
public:
    typedef iterator<T> iterator;
};

iterator.hpp:

# include a.hpp
# ifndef ITERATOR_HPP
# define ITERATOR_HPP

template <typename T>
class iterator {
public:
    // Constructor
    iterator(A<T> *a) {
    }
};

The classes are way bigger, that's why I didn't post the entire code


Obs: If it isn't possible to perform this recursive inclusion, but I could still manage to have the class iterator nested in the namespace of A, but declare outside class A, that would suffice.

share|improve this question
    
Tried using typename A<T>? – brian beuning Apr 4 '13 at 12:19
    
You mean, instead of typedef? – Rubens Apr 4 '13 at 12:20
2  
This is a recipe for trouble. – Pete Becker Apr 4 '13 at 12:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Forward declarations eliminate most of these problems. Note that you don't have to define member functions inside the class definition; you can define them later, when all the types have been defined. (If it helps, write on the blackboard 100 times: C++ is not Java).

class C;

class Iterator {
    // member function declarations
    // member data
};

class C {
    // member function declarations
    // member data
};

// member function definitions go here; there is
// no problem using C inside member
// functions of Iterator and vice versa
share|improve this answer
    
Works perfectly! Thank you very much! Just as further reference, I've used: template <typename T> class C { class iterator; };\n template <typename T> class C<T>::iterator {}; (: – Rubens Apr 4 '13 at 12:38

Perhaps make the class into a template argument of the iterator. Then the iterator won't need the immediate access to the class.

class:

#include "iterator.hpp"
template <typename T>
class A {
public:
  typedef Iterator<A, T> iterator;
};

iterator:

template <typename C, typename T>
class Iterator {
  Iterator (C* a);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'll try it out too, thanks! – Rubens Apr 4 '13 at 12:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.