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I have been trying to update a table that has 1 million records and replace the NULL values of 4 of its fields to a empty string ( "" ). Foreach and for seem to take a long long time. It took me 1 minute to update 3 000 records. Is there an easier way to update the table using linq or possibly a procedure ?

This is what i use at the moment but it takes forever and i might need to do this often :

foreach (MG_Backup item in mg)
{
    lblAllNulls.Text +="<br />ID:"+item.ID+" ";
    if (item.Name == null )
    {
        item.Name = "";
        lblAllNulls.Text += "Name ";
    }
    if (item.Company == null)
    {
        item.Company = "";
        lblAllNulls.Text += "Company ";
    }
    if (item.Addr1 == null)
    {
        item.Addr1 = "";
        lblAllNulls.Text += "Addr1 ";
    }
    if (item.Addr2 == null)
    {
        item.Addr2 = "";
        lblAllNulls.Text += "Addr2 ";
    }
    if (item.FullAddress == null)
    {
        item.FullAddress = "";
        lblAllNulls.Text += "FullAddress ";
    }
    if (item.City == null)
    {
        item.City = "";
        lblAllNulls.Text += "City ";
    }
    //saves the changes
    db.SaveChanges();
}
share|improve this question
    
This sounds like the job of a stored procedure. – asawyer Apr 4 '13 at 12:37
2  
Can you not do it via a SQL update statement? – Stony Apr 4 '13 at 12:37
1  
but i have 5 fields that i need to check if they are null, and none of them have to be null in the same time. One field might be null here, the next record might have another field as null so basically i would have to run 5 update statements over 1 million records.. that would take a lot of time.. i think... – Nathan Apr 4 '13 at 12:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You didn't show your LINQ-statement, but from your code I assume you did something like this:

var mg = from mgs in <Table>
         select mgs;
//loop you showed

This causes LINQ to fetch all items regardless of if they have to be updated or not.


Depending on how many of your records actually have to be updated you will be much faster with something like this:

var mg = from mgs in <Table>
         where mgs.Name == null || mgs.Company == null // || and so on and so forth
         select mgs;
//loop you showed
share|improve this answer
1  
that was exactly what i just did and i was coming back to post my solution but here you are with the same solution. Doing what you also suggested brought my records down from 1 million to 10k.. Not bad :) Best answer... – Nathan Apr 4 '13 at 13:04

As for the db code, you are updating each record individually. Try moving the SaveChanges() out of the loop. Or guard it with a counter and only save it every N records.

Your code for lblAllNulls shows the classic pattern that requires a StringBuilder:

foreach (MG_Backup item in mg)
{
   lblAllNulls.Text +="<br />ID:"+item.ID+" ";
   ...
}

Strings are concatenated in a foreach loop. lblAllNulls.Text has to be continuously re-allocated an copied. This gets very slow after a few thousand rounds.

share|improve this answer
1  
I am not sure your going to see much of a difference optimizing the string allocation when you are performing a million database round trips. – asawyer Apr 4 '13 at 12:44
    
@asawyer - for 1M records it's going to count. But indeed it won't come close to explaining 1 minute for 3k records,. – Henk Holterman Apr 4 '13 at 12:48
    
Sure, and mind you I've never tested this, but it would seem to me the GC would have plenty of downtime to run in while waiting for the db call to come back. – asawyer Apr 4 '13 at 12:49
    
It's not just the GC. I've demoed for(..) { s += "..."; } and it quickly becomes significant. The copying is O(n^2) – Henk Holterman Apr 4 '13 at 12:50
    
Yes that is a good point. It also just occurred to me that each .Text update is also going to update the UI, but since it's in a tight loop and the message pumping has stopped responding most likely, eliminating the string updates entirely would probably help quite a bit, or at least move them to the string builder and update the UI once when the loop is done. – asawyer Apr 4 '13 at 12:53

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