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I'm trying to assign property "itemId" for DOM element "img"

Here is code

var img = document.createElement('IMG');
window.console.log(itemId);
img.itemId = itemId;
window.console.log(img.itemId); 

After execution console contains this messages:

41
http://example.domain/41

Where example.domain - is adress of my site.

This problem appears in Opera and Mozilla, but in Chrome this code works fine (img.itemId == 41). Example: http://jsfiddle.net/uwPY5/

Can anyone explain what's going on?

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Thanks to @Rodik - your answers helpt! –  mikle Apr 4 '13 at 13:00
    
And thanks to @shadow-wizard too) –  mikle Apr 4 '13 at 13:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Very weird behavior, but try the standard way:

img.setAttribute("itemId", itemId);

To be compatible with HTML5 though, you should prefix your attribute name like this:

img.setAttribute("data-itemId", itemId);

Then to read it back:

var itemId = img.getAttribute("data-itemId");
share|improve this answer
    
Moreover, you should always prefix custom attributes like this: data-itemId –  Rodik Apr 4 '13 at 12:41
    
@Rodik why? Where is it written? I saw it first used only in jQuery. –  Shadow Wizard Apr 4 '13 at 12:42
    
A custom data attribute is an attribute in no namespace whose name starts with the string "data-", has at least one character after the hyphen, is XML-compatible, and contains no characters in the range U+0041 to U+005A (LATIN CAPITAL LETTER A to LATIN CAPITAL LETTER Z). w3.org/TR/2011/WD-html5-20110525/… –  Rodik Apr 4 '13 at 12:44
    
It is written in the HTML5 specification document. –  Rodik Apr 4 '13 at 12:45
    
I updated an example - result is just the same! (jsfiddle.net/uwPY5/2) –  mikle Apr 4 '13 at 12:53

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