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I have the following

public abstract class MyData
{
      private String sID;
      public void setsID(String sID) {
        this.sID= sID;
    }
       public String getsID() {
        return sID;
    }
} 

This base class is being extended by 2 other classes

public class DataTypeOne extends MyData
{
       private String sName;
       public void setsName(String sName) {
        this.sName= sName;
        }
           public String getsName() {
            return sName;
        }
}


public class DataTypeTwo extends MyData
{
       private String sSummary;
       public void setsSummary(String sSummary) {
        this.sSummary= sSummary;
        }
           public String getsSummary() {
            return sSummary;
        }
}

I am initializing this class as follows

MyData oDataOne = new DataTypeOne();
MyData oDataTwo = new DataTypeTwo();

Reason for that is that I have a factory method which shall give me the class based on type (One or two)

With oDataOne & oDataTwo, I am able to access getsID() from the base class but not the getters & setters of the respective class.

How can I access those? I

share|improve this question
1  
It is not possible – Arun P Johny Apr 4 '13 at 13:37
    
Object Splicing here? – a3.14_Infinity Apr 4 '13 at 13:38
    
any other approach? – Octonaut Apr 4 '13 at 13:39
    
Are you sure? Would you please explain that which methods you cannot access? – boomz Apr 4 '13 at 13:39
1  
Since you mention factories, you may want to look into using generics. Through generics it is possible to make the factory methods return a reference of type DataTypeOne or DataTypeTwo rather than MyData. – Jacob Raihle Apr 4 '13 at 13:44
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't access a method that doesn't exist. All you've promised your Java compiler is that oDataOne and oDataTwo are MyData objects. Since the MyData class doesn't have the implementation-specific methods, you cannot ask Java to call those methods (since it doesn't think they exist).

If you want to access those methods, you need to either cast the object to a class that actually has the right methods, or you can add abstract method stubs to your base class, which will tell Java that those methods actually exist.

Type casting is simpler to write in the short term, but less clear, and you may run into more trouble down the road:

((DataTypeOne) oDataOne).getsName();
((DataTypeTwo) oDataOne).getsSummary(); // Throws ClassCastException!

Adding abstract stubs is more robust, but may not make sense if not all concrete subclasses should implement all abstract methods:

public abstract class MyData {
    public abstract void setsName(String name);
    public abstract String getsName();
    public abstract void setsSummary(String summary);
    public abstract String getsSummary();
}
public class DataTypeOne extends MyData {
    public String getsName() {
        // implement
    }
    public void setsName(String name) {
        // implement
    }

    // Still have to implement these!!!
    public String getsSummary() {
        // raise an exception or something if appropriate
    }
    public void setsSummary(String summary) {
        // raise an exception or something if appropriate
    }
}
// Same for DataTypeTwo
share|improve this answer

Since you declared the variable as a MyData, you can only access the methods of MyData. You can get to the subclass methods by casting it to DataTypeOne or DataTypeTwo:

 ((DataTypeOne)oDataOne).getsName()

But you need to be sure it is of type DataTypeOne or you will get a ClassCastException

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An object of type MyData has no knowledge of whether any other classes extends it or not, so there is no way to access members of those classes.

You will have to cast your object to the specific type to access the specific members.

If you find yourself in this situation, you can be pretty sure that your design is flawed. If you need to perform a specific action for each type of MyData extension, add a method, e.g specialAction() to the interface and hide the specifics in there. That eliminates the entire need to find out which subclass you are dealing with.

share|improve this answer
MyData oDataOne = new DataTypeOne();

this says, that your oDataOne object is of the type MyData. Even if it is created as a DataTypeOne, java can only be sure that it is defiantly a MyData instance.

If you are sure that the MyData instance is in reality also a DataTypeOne instance, you can cast and then access the DataTypeOne methods + the MyData methods.

To make sure that an object is of a specific type test:

if(oDataOne instanceOf DataTypeOne){
    ((DataTypeOne) oDataOne).getsName();  // this will return the Name if oDataOne is really of the type DataTypeOne
}
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